ISLAM and MUSLIMS IN PUERTO RICO

      

General Information

COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RICO

Status                        : Commonwealth

Land area                  : 3,459 sq mi (8,959 sq km); total area: 3,515 sq mi (9,104 sq km)

Population (2006 est.) : 3,927,188

Capital and largest city (2002 est.): San Juan, 433,412

Other large cities      : Bayamón, 224,670; Ponce, 186,112; Carolina, 187,468

Monetary unit           : U.S. dollar

Languages               : Spanish and English (both official)

Ethnicity/race           : white (mostly Spanish origin) 80.5%, black 8%, Amerindian 0.4%, Asian 0.2%, mixed and other 10.9%

Religions                 : Roman Catholic 85%, Protestant and other 15%

Literacy rate            : 94.1% (2002)

Economic summary : GDP/PPP (2007 est.): $77.41 billion; per capita $19,600 Real growth rate: 1.2%. Inflation: 6.5% (2003 est.).

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is located in the Caribbean Sea, about 1,000 mi east-southeast of Miami, Fla. A possession of the United States, it consists of the island of Puerto Rico plus the adjacent islets of Vieques, Culebra, and Mona. Puerto Rico has a mountainous, tropical ecosystem with very little flat land and few mineral resources.

Puerto Rico's governor is elected directly for a four-year term. A bicameral legislature consists of a 27-member Senate and a 51-member House of Representatives, all elected for four-year terms. From 1940 to 1968, Puerto Rican politics was dominated by a party advocating voluntary association with the U.S. Since then, the New Progressive Party, a party favoring U.S. statehood, has won five of the last eight gubernatorial elections. Puerto Ricans have twice voted to determine their political status. In 1967, the outcome was Commonwealth 60%; statehood 39%; independence 1%. In 1993, Commonwealth dropped to 48.6%; statehood rose to 46.3%; independence polled 4.4%; and 0.6% of the ballots were blank or spoiled.

Under the Commonwealth formula, residents of Puerto Rico lack voting representation in Congress and do not participate in presidential elections. As U.S. citizens, Puerto Ricans are subject to military service and most federal laws. Residents of the Commonwealth pay no federal income tax on locally generated earnings, but Puerto Rican government income-tax rates are set at a level that closely parallels federal-plus-state levies on the mainland.

When Christopher Columbus arrived there in 1493, the island was inhabited by the peaceful Arawak Indians, who were being challenged by the warlike Carib Indians. Puerto Rico remained economically undeveloped until 1830, when sugarcane, coffee, and tobacco plantations were gradually developed. After Puerto Ricans began to press for independence, Spain granted the island broad powers of self-government in 1897. But during the Spanish-American War of 1898 American troops invaded the island and Spain ceded it to the U.S. Since then, Puerto Rico has remained an unincorporated U.S. territory. Its people were granted American citizenship under the Jones Act in 1917; were permitted to elect their own governor, beginning in 1948; and now fully administer their internal affairs under a constitution approved by the U.S. Congress in 1952.

Islamic History and Muslims

Islam in Puerto Rico: 2004 official data estimated there are 6000 Muslims in Puerto Rico, representing about 0.13 percent of the population, although many Muslims on the island claim the numbers are much larger. Reports say that Muslims came before and with Christopher Columbus. However, The biggest wave of Muslims came between 40s and 60s when Palestinians were fleeing the Israeli invasion and inhumane atrocities. As a result, more than 90% of Muslims in Puerto Rico are of Palestinian origin. The early Muslim community largely consisted of Palestinians who arrived between 1958 and 1962. At the time, the vast majority of Puerto Rico's Muslims lived in Río Piedras – a crowded suburb of San Juan – where they operated restaurants, jewelry stores and clothing outlets. For years a storefront mosque on Calle Padre Colón served the entire community.

Today there are mosques and Islamic Centers in Aguadilla, San Juan, Hatillo, Ponce, Arecibo, and Río Piedras. A list of all mosques in Puerto Rico as of 2008 is available at http://www.pupr.edu/msa/mosques.html . The American Muslim Association of North America (AMANA) also has an office in Cayey. Similar to their counterparts in the United States (particularly New York), large numbers of indigenous Puerto Ricans are becoming interested in Islam.

General activities are Jumua Prayer, Eids, Ramadan, some weekly leactures in some Mosques once.Many Puerto Ricans are interested in Islam and come to the Mosque. No stats on conversion rates, but there are many Puerto Rico Muslim converts, I would say around 5% of Muslims in Puerto Rico. Typically each Islamic Center is an organization that makes its own activities.

  Islamic Centers and Organizations

Organization Name

Address

Phone-Fax-Email-Web

General Information

AMANA - The American Muslim Association of North America - Puerto Rico Office

AMANA - The American Muslim Association of North America - Puerto Rico Office
P.O. Box 140494, ARECIBO,
Cayey, Puerto Rico 00614, PUERTO RICO

787-879-5425
787-879-5425
amanapr@hotmail.com
www.al-amana.org

The Islamic Center for Reaching and Preaching. ISLAM honors Civil Rights We Honor them Too!!!

Muslim Students Association @ Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico

Muslim Students Association @ Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico
P. O. Box 192017,
San Juan, Puerto Rico 00919, PUERTO RICO

787-622-8000x340
787-281-8342
hkettani@pupr.edu
http://www.pupr.edu/msa
 

The Muslim Students Association at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico (MSA@PUPR) is affiliated with the Muslim Students Association of the United States and Canada (MSA National). MSA@PUPR is located at the capital San Juan of the Caribbean Island of Puerto Rico, which is a US territory. Our mission is to (1)Enhance Muslim students involvement and participation in "Islamic" activities on-campus and/or community. (2)Improve and increase the educational activities directed towards the non-muslim population on-campus in order to increase awareness and better understanding of the Islamic faith at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico.

Islamic center of Puerto Rico

Islamic center of Puerto Rico
Camino Los Romeros, Montehiedra, San Juan , Puerto Rico 00926, PUERTO RICO

umar977@yahoo.com
www.alislaminpuertorico.com

 

ISLAMIC CENTER OF RIO PIEDRAS  - San Juan

ISLAMIC CENTER OF RIO PIEDRAS - San Juan
#215 Padre Colon Street Box 25309, Rio Piedras,
San Juan,  Puerto Rico 00928, PUERTO RICO

787-766-1235
787-766-1235
centroislamicopr@aol.com

The Islamic Center give regular prayer and jumma services to all metroplitan-area Muslims. The services are in arabic and translated simultaneously in Spanish and/or English (as needed).Islamic Studies- (Arabic),Tafseer, Hadith and Seerah, Arabic Language (for men), For Spanish/English Speakers. Khudabs are in arabic translated simultaneously to Spanish and available on written version in Spanish and English.

Islamic Center at Ponce

Islamic Center at Ponce
#7 Luna St., Ponce,
Ponce, Puerto Rico 00717, PUERTO RICO


787-515-7111
yb2030@gmai.com
 

 

Hatillo Islamic Center

Hatillo Islamic Center
Intersection of Hwy 22 with Hwy 2, Hatillo, Puerto Rico 00659, PUERTO RICO

787-505-3485
787-602-8430

 

Islamic Center of Vega Alta (Masjid el Faruq)

Islamic Center of Vega Alta (Masjid el Faruq)

Calle Caiman, Vega Alta, Puerto Rico 00692, PUERTO RICO

787-472-0400

Islam Teaching

Islamic Center of Fajardo

Islamic Center of Fajardo
AA14 Calle 1, Monte Brisa 2,
Fajardo, , PUERTO RICO

 Directio787-215-5777

 

Aguadilla - Herencia Andalusi Islamic Cultural Center

Aguadilla - Herencia Andalusi Islamic Cultural Center
Carretera 111,
Aguadilla, PR 00603, PUERTO RICO

787-226-3326
info@herenciaandalusi.com
www.herenciaandalusi.com

Quran & Hadith Studies,Quranic Classes and discussion

Mayaguez Islamic Center

Mayaguez Islamic Center
PR-00680,
Mayagüez, PR , PUERTO RICO

787-833-2106
skahadali@hotmail.com 

 

Islamic Center of Jayuya

Islamic Center of Jayuya

Jayuya, PR 00664

787-614-8278

 

Islamic Center of Montehiedra

Islamic Center of Montehiedra

9329 Camino Luciano Vasquez, Montehiedra, San Juan, PR 00926

787-502-2313

 

Local Mosque

local mosque
moca near the university metro politana,
Moca, , PUERTO RICO

 

some Islamic guys take apartment and made it like small mosque to could pry together and we hope soon become more bigger

PUERTO RICO MULTI-SERVICES, INC.

PUERTO RICO MULTI-SERVICES, INC.
P.O.BOX 113,
Loiza, PUERTO RICO 00772, PUERTO RICO

787-876-2943
drlcortiz123@earthlink.net

: WE ARE A NON-PROFIT (501-C3) ORGANIZATION. WE ASSIST IN ALL AREAS OF SOCIAL AND CIVIL ISSUES. WE ARE STAFFED BY VOLUNTEERS AND OUR OBJECTIVES ARE TO PROVIDE QUALITY OF LIFE ENHANCEMENTS TO ALL PEOPLE REGARDLESS OF RELIGION. AN APPROPRIATE AREA FOR SALAAT IS AVAILABLE TO AREA MUSLIMS AND VISITORS.

 

 

 

 

AMuslim Owned Business

Organization Name

Address

Phone-Fax-Email-Web

General Information

Wilfredo A. Ruiz - Attorney at Law

Wilfredo A. Ruiz - Attorney at Law
129 park Rd. , Ramey; Aguadilla, PR 00603,
Aguadilla, Puerto Rico 00603, PUERTO RICO

787-505-3485
787-505-3485
wruizlaw@yahoo.com
www.al-amana.org
amrfaarooq@yahoo.com

Legal counseling and representation before local and federal courts. Franchise and Hospitality Law

 

CARIMBO: Antique Furniture Restorer [Br.Yasser Reyes]

CARIMBO: Antique Furniture Restorer [Br.Yasser Reyes]
P.O. Box 140494,
Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00613, PUERTO RICO


787-566-1028
amanapr@hotmail.com

 

Salims Electronic Center

Salims Electronic Center
GMO Esteves #48,
Jayuya, 00664, PUERTO RICO

787-828 0021
787 828 6304
radwanhusni@hotmail.com

Information: Furniture _ Appliance Electronics and Acc

 

 

 

 

 

References
Islam in Puerto Rico ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam_in_Puerto_Rico , June, 2008).
Info please ( http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0113949.html   June, 2008).
Islam Finder ( http://www.islamicfinder.org/cityPrayerNew.php?country=puerto_rico  , June, 2008).
Anonymous, Documents from Representatives of Islamic Organizations in Puerto Rico, June 2008.