ISLAM and MUSLIMS IN SAUDI ARABIA

      

General Information

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

National name: Al-Mamlaka al-'Arabiya as-Sa'udiya

Land area: 829,995 sq mi (2,149,690 sq km)

Population (2007 est.): 27,601,038

Capital and largest city (2003 est.): Riyadh, 3,724,100

Other large cities: Jeddah, 2,745,000; Makkah (Mecca), 1,614,800

Monetary unit: Riyal

Language: Arabic

Ethnicity/race: Arab 90%, Afro-Asian 10%

Religion: Islam 100%

Literacy rate: 79% (2003 est.)

Economic summary: GDP/PPP (2007 est.): $564.6 billion; per capita $23,200. Real growth rate: 4.1%. Inflation: 4.1%.

audi Arabia occupies most of the Arabian Peninsula, with the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba to the west and the Persian Gulf to the east. Neighboring countries are Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, the Sultanate of Oman, Yemen, and Bahrain, connected to the Saudi mainland by a causeway. Saudi Arabia contains the world's largest continuous sand desert, the Rub Al-Khali, or Empty Quarter. Its oil region lies primarily in the eastern province along the Persian Gulf.

Saudi Arabia is not only the homeland of the Arab peoples—it is thought that the first Arabs originated on the Arabian Peninsula—but also the homeland of Islam, the world's second-largest religion. Muhammad founded Islam there, and it is the location of the two holy pilgrimage cities of Mecca and Medina. The Islamic calendar begins in 622, the year of the hegira, or Muhammad's flight from Mecca. A succession of invaders attempted to control the peninsula, but by 1517 the Ottoman Empire dominated, and in the middle of the 18th century, it was divided into separate principalities. In 1745 Muhammad ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab began calling for the purification and reform of Islam, and the Wahhabi movement swept across Arabia. By 1811, Wahhabi leaders had waged a jihad—a holy war—against other forms of Islam on the peninsula and succeeded in uniting much of it. By 1818, however, the Wahhabis had been driven out of power again by the Ottomans and their Egyptian allies.

The kingdom of Saudi Arabia is almost entirely the creation of King Ibn Saud (1882–1953). A descendant of Wahhabi leaders, he seized Riyadh in 1901 and set himself up as leader of the Arab nationalist movement. By 1906 he had established Wahhabi dominance in Nejd and conquered Hejaz in 1924–1925. The Hejaz and Nejd regions were merged to form the kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 1932, which was an absolute monarchy ruled by sharia.

Islamic History and Muslims



The vast majority of Saudis are Sunni Muslims. Around 10% of citizens are Shia Muslims, most of whom live in the Eastern Province, with the largest concentrations in Qatif, Al-Ahsa, and Dammam, another large concentrations is found in Najran, in addition to a small minority in Medina. Islam is the established religion, and as such its institutions receive government support.

Non-Muslim populations of Saudi Arabia are dominantly found in populations of foreign workers. Saudi Arabia has an estimated foreign population of 8 million, most of whom are Muslim. Comprehensive statistics for the religious denominations of foreigners are not available; however, they include Muslims from the various branches and schools of Islam, Christians, and Hindus.
Islamic history

In the first centuries conversion to Islam followed the rapid growth of the Muslim world created by the conquests of the Rashidun and Umayyad Caliphs. Muslim dynasties were soon established and subsequent empires such as those of the Abbasids, Almoravides, Seljuk Turks, Mughals and Safavid Persia and Ottomans were among the largest and most powerful in the world. The people in the Islamic world made many centers of culture and science, and produced merchants, travellers, notable scientists, astronomers, mathematicians, doctors and philosophers initiating a Golden Age of Islam. The activities of this quasi-political community of believers and nations, or ummah, resulted in the spread of Islam.

Salafi theology

The political and cultural environment of contemporary Saudi Arabia has been influenced by a religious movement that began in central Arabia in the mid-eighteenth century. This movement, commonly known as the Salafi movement, grew out of the scholarship and preaching of Muhammad ibn Abd al Wahhab, a scholar of Islamic jurisprudence who had studied in Iraq and the Hijaz before returning to his native Najd to preach his message of Islamic reform. He started preaching Islam by opposing all the four madhabs(Hanafi,Maliki,shafii & Hanbali). According to him ,Quran and hadith can be followed directly so no need of accepting Imam's.

Pilgrimage

The hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca, occurs annually between the eighth and thirteenth days of the last month of the Muslim year, Dhul Hijja. The hajj represents the culmination of the Muslim's spiritual life. For many, it is a lifelong ambition. From the time of embarking on the journey to make the hajj, pilgrims often experience a spirit of exaltation and excitement; the meeting of so many Muslims of all races, cultures, and stations in life in harmony and equality moves many people deeply. Certain rites of pilgrimage may be performed any time, and although meritorious, these constitute a lesser pilgrimage, known as umrah.

The Ministry of Pilgrimage Affairs and Religious Trusts handles the immense logistical and administrative problems generated by such a huge international gathering. The government issues special pilgrimage visas that permit the pilgrim to visit Mecca and to make the customary excursion to Medina to visit the Prophet's tomb. Care is taken to assure that pilgrims do not remain in the kingdom after the hajj to search for work.

An elaborate guild of specialists assists the hajjis. Guides (mutawwifs) who speak the pilgrim's language make the necessary arrangements in Mecca and instruct the pilgrim in the proper performance of rituals; assistants (wakils) provide subsidiary services. Separate groups of specialists take care of pilgrims in Medina and Jiddah. Water drawers (zamzamis) provide water drawn from the sacred well.

Since the late 1980s, the Saudis have been particularly energetic in catering to the needs of pilgrims. In 1988 a US$l5 billion traffic improvement scheme for the holy sites was launched. The improvement initiative resulted partly from Iranian charges that the Saudi government was incompetent to guard the holy sites after a 1987 clash between demonstrating Iranian pilgrims and Saudi police left 400 people dead. A further disaster occurred in 1990, when 1,426 pilgrims suffocated or were crushed to death in one of the new air-conditioned pedestrian tunnels built to shield pilgrims from the heat. The incident resulted from the panic that erupted in the overcrowded and inadequately ventilated tunnel, and further fueled Iranian claims that the Saudis did not deserve to be in sole charge of the holy places. In 1992, however, 114,000 Iranian pilgrims, close to the usual level, participated in the hajj.

Historically, Saudi Arabia has occupied a special place in the Islamic world, for it is towards Makkah and Islam's most sacred shrine, the Ka'abah, located in the Holy Mosque there, that Muslims throughout the world turn devoutly in prayer five times a day. An appreciation of Islamic history and culture is therefore essential for a genuine understanding of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, its Islamic heritage and its leading role in the Arab and Muslim worlds.

To symbolize their leadership of the worldwide community of Muslims as well as their guardianship of the holy sites, Saudi kings address the pilgrimage gathering annually. The Saudis also provide financial assistance to aid selected groups of foreign Muslims to attend the hajj. In 1992, in keeping with its interests in proselytizing among Muslims in the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union, the Saudi government sponsored the pilgrimage for hundreds of Muslims from Azerbaijan, Tashkent, and Mongolia.

Islamism in Saudi Arabia

The decade of the 1980s was characterized by the rise of ultraconservative, politically activist Islamist movements in much of the Arab world. These Islamist movements, labeled fundamentalist in the West, sought the government institutionalization of Islamic laws and social principles. Although Saudi Arabia already claimed to be an Islamic government whose constitution is the Qur'an, the kingdom has not been immune to this conservative trend.

In Saudi Arabia, the 1960s, and especially the 1970s, had been years of explosive development, liberal experimentation, and openness to the West. A reversal of this trend came about abruptly in 1979, the year in which the Grand Mosque in Mecca came under attack by religiously motivated critics of the monarchy, and the Islamic Republic of Iran was established. Each of these events signaled that religious conservatism would have to be politically addressed with greater vigor. Although the mosque siege was carried out by a small band of zealots and their actions of shooting in the mosque appalled most Muslims, their call for less ostentation on the part of the Saudi rulers and for a halt to the cultural inundation of the kingdom by the West struck a deep chord of sympathy across the kingdom. At the same time, Ayatollah Khomeini's call to overthrow the Al Saud was a direct challenge to the legitimacy of the monarchy as custodian of the holy places, and a challenge to the stability of the kingdom with its large Shia minority.

In the years following these events, the rise of the ultraconservative periphery has caused the vast center of society to shift in a conservative direction, producing greater polarity between those who are Western-oriented and the rest of society. The 1991 Persian Gulf War marked another dramatic shift toward conservative sentiment, and this conservative trend continued to gain momentum in the early 1990s.

The conservative revival has been manifest in literature, in individual behavior, in government policies, in official and unofficial relations with foreigners, in mosque sermons, and in protest demonstrations against the government. The revival was also apparent in increased religious programming on television and radio, and an increase in articles about religion in newspapers.

On an individual level, some Saudi citizens, especially educated young women, were expressing the revivalist mood by supplementing the traditional Saudi Islamic hijab (literally curtain or veil), a black cloak, black face veil, and hair covering, with long black gloves to hide the hands. In some cases, women who formerly had not covered their faces began to use the nontransparent covering once worn mainly by women of traditional families. Some, especially younger, university- educated women, wore the hijab when traveling in Europe or the United States to demonstrate the sincerity of their belief in following the precepts of Islam.

In the Hijaz, another expression of the Islamic revival was participation in the ritual celebration of popular Islamic holidays. Some elite Hijazi families, for example, have revived the mawlid, a gathering for communal prayer on the occasion of the Prophet's birthday, or to celebrate a birth, mourn a death, bless a new house, or seek God's favor in fulfillment of some wish, such as cure of an illness or the birth of a child. Mawlid rituals, especially when performed by women, were suppressed by King Abdul Aziz Al-Saud when he conquered the Hijaz because they incorporated intercession and the Salafis considered them the equivalent of polytheism.

Reacting to the revivalist mood, the government has backed the mutawwiin in responding to calls for controls over behavior perceived as non-Islamic. In November 1990, a group of forty-seven women staged a demonstration to press their claim for the right to drive. The mutawwiin demanded that the women be punished. The government confiscated the women's passports after sentenced them to public flogging, and those employed as teachers were fired. The previously unofficial ban on women's driving quickly became official. As a further indication of the growing conservatism, considerable criticism of the women's behavior in asking for the right to drive came from within the women's branch of the university in Riyadh.

Religiously sanctioned behavior, once thought to be the responsibility of families, was being increasingly institutionalized and enforced. Women, for example, were usually prevented from traveling abroad unless accompanied by a male chaperon (mahram), a marked shift from the policy of the late 1970s, when a letter granting permission to travel was considered sufficient. This rule has compounded the difficulties for women wishing to study abroad: a 1982 edict remained in force that restricted scholarships for women to those whose father, husband, or brother was able to remain with them during the period of study.

State funding has increased for the nationwide organization of mutawwiin that is incorporated into the civil service bureaucracy. Once responsible primarily for enforcing the attendance of men in the mosque at prayer time, the tasks of the mutawwiin since the 1980s have come to include enforcing public abstinence from eating, drinking, and smoking among both Muslims and non-Muslims in the daylight hours during Ramadan. The mutawwiin (also seen as Committees for the Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice or Committees for Public Morality) are also responsible for seeing that shops are closed at prayer time and that modest dress is maintained in public. Foreign women are required to cover the arms and legs, and men and women who were unrelated might be apprehended for traveling together in a car. In the early 1980s, an offending couple might have received an official reprimand, but in the early 1990s they might experience more serious consequences.

The rise in conservatism also can be seen in measures taken to obstruct non-Muslim religious services. Non-Muslim services have long been discouraged, but never prohibited, in Arabia. Even at the height of the Salafi revival in the 1920s, Christian missionary doctors held prayer services in the palace of Abdul Aziz Al-Saud. In the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, Christian religious services were held regularly in private houses and in housing compounds belonging to foreign companies, and these services were usually ignored by mutawwiin as long as they did not attract public attention or encourage proselytism. With the end of the Persian Gulf War, however, mutawwiin began to enforce a ban on non-Muslim worship and punished offenders. In 1991, it is claimed, a large number of mutawwiin accompanied by uniformed police broke up a Christian service in Riyadh and arrested a number of participants, including children.

The most significant indicator of the growing shift toward conservatism was the willingness of the state to silence opposition groups. For example, in May 1991, more than 400 men from the religious establishment and universities, including Saudi Arabia's most prominent legal scholar, Shaykh Abd al Aziz ibn Baz, petitioned the King to create a consultative council, a request to which the King responded favorably in February 1992. In their petition, however, the signatories asked not only for more participation in decision making, but also for a revision of all laws, including commercial and administrative regulations, to conform with the sharia. They asked for the creation of Islamic banks and an end to interest payments in established banks, as well as the redistribution of wealth, protection for the rights of the individual, censure of the media so that it would serve Islam and morality, and the creation of a strong army so that the kingdom would not be dependent on the West. The requests represented a combination of apparently liberal petitions (a consultative council, redistribution of wealth) with a conservative religious bent.

In a follow-up to the petition, a number of the signatories wrote a letter stating that funds for religious institutions were being cut back, that the institutions were not being given the resources to create jobs, and that their fatwas were being ignored. The letter further claimed that those who signed the original petition had had their passports confiscated and were being harassed by security personnel even though "they had committed no other crime than giving advice to the Guardian." This affair suggested that the government was sufficiently concerned about the increasingly conservative mood to shift its strategy from merely co-opting the conservative agenda to suppressing its extreme voices.

In another incident, a movement called Islamic Awakening, which had a growing following in religious colleges and universities, attempted to hold a public demonstration in early 1991, but participants were threatened with arrest if they did so. At the same time, the government arrested a well-known activist in the Islamic Awakening while he was preaching a sermon in a Riyadh mosque.

Factors contributing to the increased attraction of Islamic conservatism included the problem of impending loss of identity caused by overwhelming Westernization. As secular education, population mobility, the breakup of extended family households, and the employment of women chipped away at cherished institutions of family and society, religion was a refuge and a source of stability.

Another factor was disaffection with the existing economic system in the face of rising unemployment. During the rapid expansion of the 1970s, employment in the public sector was virtually assured for Saudi citizens with technical skills and for those with a Western education. By the end of the decade, however, those positions, especially in education and in the ministries, came under pressure from increasing numbers of university graduates with rising expectations that no longer could be fulfilled in public sector employment. In addition, in the 1990s a growing number of young men educated in Islamic colleges and universities were unemployed; their acquired knowledge and skills were becoming more irrelevant to the demands of the economy and bureaucratic infrastructure, even within the judiciary where traditionally Islamic scholarship was most highly valued.

An additional factor lay in the monarchy's continuing need to maintain legitimacy as an "Islamic government." As long as the ruling family believes it must continue to prove itself a worthy inheritor of the legacy on which the kingdom was founded, it will be obliged to foster religious education and the Islamic political culture in which the kingdom's media are steeped. A lesser factor in the rise of conservatism may be widespread sympathy with the sense of being victimized by the West.

Islam remained the primary cohesive ideology in the kingdom, the source of legitimacy for the monarchy, and the pervasive system for moral guidance and spirituality. The nature of the Islamic society Saudi Arabia wished to have in the future, however, was one of the important and passionately debated issues in the kingdom in the early 1990s. The ultraconservative moral agenda appealed on an emotional level to many Saudi citizens. But the desire to expand the jurisdiction of sharia law and to interfere with the banking system was also a source of concern for many people. Because nearly all Saudis have reaped material benefits from state-funded development, people were hesitant to jeopardize those benefits and the political stability that allowed development. Some have suggested that the new system of basic laws was a clear signal that the monarchy was firmly committed to liberalization and no longer felt compelled to tolerate conservative excesses. Close assessment of the implications of the basic laws suggested, however, that the monarchy was making no substantive changes and, in effect, was taking no chances to risk disturbing the balance among competing religious persuasions in the kingdom.

 

  Pilgrims in the annual Hajj at the Kaabah in Mecca.

Masjid Nabawi Mosque in Medina, Saudi Arabia

  The Qiblatain Mosque is one of the oldest mosques in the world.
 

 

  The Qubah Mosque is a beautiful example of early Islamic architecture and draws many pilgrims, such as these journalists from around the Islamic world.

King Saud Mosque in  Jeddah.

   Islamic Centers and Organizations

    جامعة الملك عبد العزيز, Jeddah
URL: http://www.kau.edu.sa   Phone: 0271586

Almasjed Alharam (Al-Haram) المسجد الحرام, Makkah, Makkah al-Mukarramah

AL FURQAN CENTER, Dammam, EASTERN PROVANCE
Phone: 0096638070649

Masjed Nabawi المسجد النبوي, Madina
 

jame'a shaikh alislam ibn taimiah, Riyadh, riyadh
URL: www.taimiah.org   Phone: +96614250099

تسجيلات القراء الاسلاميه, Dammam, المنطقه الشرقيه


مجلة الدعوة- أسبوعية إسلامية جامعة, Riyadh, Riyadh
URL: http://aldaawah.com   Phone: 01-4854367/4856877

DARUL UMRA (SHUA NABRAS EST.), Makkah
Phone: 00966-25590051

AL-Rajhi Banking & Investment Corp, Riyadh, Riyadh
URL: www.alrajhibank.com.sa   Phone: 00966-14601000

AL-SAIDA AMENA ZAHED MOSQUE, Jeddah
Phone: 00962-6912913

AL FURQAN CENTER, Dammam
  Al Raf'ah Mosque, Tarut Island
  Al Ras,ah mosque, RIJal Alma`
  AL TAQWA, Jeddah
  Al-Hajar Mine Mosque, Al Hajrah
  Al-MESFAR MOSQUE, Baljurshi
  AL-SAIDA AMENA ZAHED MOSQUE, Jeddah
  Al-Waha mousque (UDH), Udhailiyah
  Albra bin Azeb Mosque, Dammam
  Alhadheb, Alola
  Allami Mosque, Jeddah
  Almasjed Alharam (Al-Haram) المسجد الحرام, Makkah
  Almostaudaat mosque, Makkah
  Alsafaniya mosq, Safaniya
  Alwaha Mosque, Udayliyah
  Anas bin Malik mosque, Al-Huwaiylat, Jubail
  Bugshan Mosque, Jeddah
  Fahad Bin Mufleh Al-Subai'e Mosque, Dammam
  Haradh camp masjed, Haradh Camp
  Islamic Cultural Center, Dammam
  jame'a shaikh alislam ibn taimiah, Riyadh
  Jamea Alruwaidah, Ruwaydah
  KANO MOUSQE, Dammam
  Khoawa Mosque, Khoawa
  King a/aziz masjid, Badaya
  King fahad mosque, Al Hufuf
  King Fahad Mosque, Hassa
  King Fahd Mosque, Dammam
  King Faisal Mosque, Abha
  Marwai Islamic Center, Gizan
  Masjed Al-Shaik Ibn Baz, Dhahran
  Masjed Nabawi المسجد النبوي, Madina
  MASJID AL KARAM, Makkah
  Masjid Al-Raza, Jeddah
  Masjid Taawon, Jeddah
  Naief Ibn Abd-Alaziz Mosque, Jubail
  Net Islamic Group, Riyadh
  Ra's Tanura Cooperative Da'awah & Guidance Office, Ra's Tannurah
  Saudi Aramco Masjid, Shaybah
  مركز الفرقان الأسلامي, Dammam
  مركز الدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بمحافظة ينبع, Yanbu` Al Bahr
  مسجد موسى بن نصير بحي ج 16, Yanbu Al-Bahar
  مسجد مستشفى الملك عبد العزيز التخصصي بالطائف, Taif
  مسجد نافع بن سالم بحي الصالحية, Arar
  مسجد أبو موسى الأشعري, Khobar
  مسجد أبو حنيفة, Ra's At Tannurah
  مسجد إبراهيم الخليل, Saihat
  مسجد الفالح AlFaleh Mosque, Sakakah
  مسجد الفاضل, Buraidah
  مسجد القاسم, Saihat
مسجد الملك فهد, Ha'il
  مسجد الملك فهد, Taif
  مسجد المبرز, Mubarraz
  مسجد النور, Riyadh
  مسجد الوهلان, Anaizah
  مسجد اليزبد بن الحارث, Yanbu Al-Bahar
  مسجد الإمام الذهبي, Jeddah
  مسجد التقوى بحي الأقيفه, Yanbu al-Bahar
  مسجد الحويفي, Arar
  مسجد الحرمين, Al Khubar
  مسجد الحزم, Riyadh
  مسجد الخليفي, Makkah
  مسجد الدعوة والارشاد, Tabouk
  مسجد الرحمة, Dhahran
  مسجد الشيخ الهاجري, Thadig
  مسجد الشيخ بن باز, Taif
  مسجد الشيخ بشير, Al Qatif
  مسجد الشجرة, Al Qatif
  مسجد العمال, DHAHRAN
  مسجد العزيزية, أضم
  مسجد العسيلة, Hofuf
  مسجد جامع التقوى, Arar
  مسجد خديجة بنت خويلد, Arar
  مسجد عمر بن الخطاب, Jeddah
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بمحافظة النعيرية, Naairiya
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالمسيجيد, Musaijid
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالدلم,
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالدلم, Dilam
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالدلم, Ad Dilam
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات برفحاء, Rafha
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والارشاد بالدوادمي, Duwadimi
  المسجد الكبير, Yanbu`
  المعهد العلمي في محافظة وادي الدواسر, Wadi -al-Dowsiri
  توعية الجاليات toet aljaliat, Tabouk
  جمعية البر الخيريه, Al Qaysumah
  جامع محمد بن ابراهيم ال الشيخ, Yanbu Al-Bahar
  جامع محمد بن عبد الوهاب, Buraidah
  جامع محمد حمود الفوزان,
  جامع مدينة مستور, مستور
  جامع معاذ بن جبل, Ahl Al Ash`af
  جامع الملك فهد بن عبد العزيز, Haila
  جامع المندق, Mandak
  جامع المهنا, Shagra
  جامع اليرموك, Dammam
  جامع الامام البخاري, Abha
  جامع التويجري بالسداد, Taif
  جامع الحسيكي, Baljurashi
  جامع الروضة بقرية الرمادة, Al Bahah
  جامع الريان - Al-Rayaan Mosque, Dammam
 
جامع الراجحي, Haffar El Batin

جامع الراشد, Buraidah
  جامع الرحمانية, Skaka
  جامع السوق, Kulayyah
  جامع السالمية, Riyadh
  جامع الشيخ عبدالعزيز بن باز, Ad Dilam
  جامع الظهران, Dhahran
  جامع العلامه الشيخ بن باز رحمه الله, Yanbu Al Sinaiyah
  جامع العناني, Jeddah
  جامع ابن تيمية , Dammam
  جامع ابوبكر الصديق, Yanbu al Sinaiyah
  جامع ارطاوي الكبير, Artawi ar Raqqas
  جامع خباب بن الارت, Dammam
  جامع عمر بن عبدالعزيز, Buraidah
  جامع عبدالله بن عباس, Taif
 
جامع عثمان بن عفان, Ra's At Tannurah

Abha Communities Center, Abha
  Afif islamic daowa and education office, Riyadh
  Al Khobar Co-operative office for Call & Guidance ( Jaliyat Ashati ), Dammam
  Al-ahsa islamic center, Al Ahsa
  Alharamain, Ad Dammam
  Assembly Of Muslim Youth (WAMY), Dammam
  Assembly of Saudi Graduate Alumni of American Universities (ASGAAU), Riyadh
  Binothaimeen CHarity Foundation, Unaiza
  charitable organization, بُرَيدَة
  Cooperative Office for Call and Guidance, Jeddah
  DARUL UMRA (SHUA NABRAS EST.), Makkah
  Hajeej for Umrah & Haj Services, Jeddah
  Int'l. Association for New Muslims الهيئة العالمية للمسلمين الجدد, Jeddah
  International Association For new muslims, Jeddah
  International Islamic Relief Organisation, Jedda
  Islamic Development Bank, Jeddah
  Islamic Education Foundation, Jeddah
  Islamic University of Madinah al-Munauwarah, Madina
  Jeddah Dawah Center (JDC), Jeddah
  Jubail Dawah and Guidance Center (Women Branch), Jubail
  Kerala Islahi Center, Dammam
  Nurul Islam Yield Youth Association, Rusthof
  لجنة التنمية الاجتماعية برنيه, Ranyah
  لجنة الدعوة والتعليم بالمدينة المنورة, Madina
  مؤسسة الحرمين الخيرية, Jeddah
  مؤسسة الحرمين الخيرية, Hafar al Batin
  مؤسسة ابن باز الخيرية, Dilam
  مؤسسة بن باز الخيرية, Yanbu Al Sinaiyah
  مجلة منارات, Riyadh
  مجلة الدعوة- أسبوعية إسلامية جامعة, Riyadh
  مركز البيان الطلابي, Ra's Tannurah
  مركز الدعوة ودعوة الجاليات, Rabigh
  مزكز دعوة الجاليات في الجبيل, Jubail
  هيئة الإغاثة الإسلمية العالمية, Dammam
  هيئة الإغاثة الإسلامية العالمية, Khobar
  هيئة الإغاثة بالمذنب, Midhnib
  وقف الشيخ علي آل قطيم, سراة عبيدة
  WORLD ASSEMBLY OF MUSLIM YOUTH, Khamis Mushait
  World Assembly of Muslim Youth (WAMY), Riyadh Mil
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة و توعية الجاليات, MAJMA`A
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد و توعية الجاليات بمحاقظة بدر, Badr
  المركز التعاوني للدعوة والارشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالجب, Jubail
  الندوة العالمية للشباب الإسلامي مكتب الأحساء, Hofuf
  الندوة العالمية للشباب الاسلامي, Al Jubayl
  الندوة العالمية للشباب الاسلامي, Sulaiyil
  الندوةالعالمية للشباب الاسلامي, Sulayyil
  الهيئة الإسلامية العالمية للتعليم(IIoem), Madina
  الجمعية الخيرية بالدلم, Dilam
  الجمعية الخيرية بحي المقيطع, Duba
 
الحرفية للبناء, Buraidah

مسجد الملك فهد, Ha'il
  مسجد الملك فهد, Taif
  مسجد المبرز, Mubarraz
  مسجد النور, Riyadh
  مسجد الوهلان, Anaizah
  مسجد اليزبد بن الحارث, Yanbu Al-Bahar
  مسجد الإمام الذهبي, Jeddah
  مسجد التقوى بحي الأقيفه, Yanbu al-Bahar
  مسجد الحويفي, Arar
  مسجد الحرمين, Al Khubar
  مسجد الحزم, Riyadh
  مسجد الخليفي, Makkah
  مسجد الدعوة والارشاد, Tabouk
  مسجد الرحمة, Dhahran
  مسجد الشيخ الهاجري, Thadig
  مسجد الشيخ بن باز, Taif
  مسجد الشيخ بشير, Al Qatif
  مسجد الشجرة, Al Qatif
  مسجد العمال, DHAHRAN
  مسجد العزيزية, أضم
  مسجد العسيلة, Hofuf
  مسجد جامع التقوى, Arar
  مسجد خديجة بنت خويلد, Arar
  مسجد عمر بن الخطاب, Jeddah
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بمحافظة النعيرية, Naairiya
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالمسيجيد, Musaijid
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالدلم,
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالدلم, Dilam
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات بالدلم, Ad Dilam
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والإرشاد وتوعية الجاليات برفحاء, Rafha
  المكتب التعاوني للدعوة والارشاد بالدوادمي, Duwadimi
  المسجد الكبير, Yanbu`
  المعهد العلمي في محافظة وادي الدواسر, Wadi -al-Dowsiri
  توعية الجاليات toet aljaliat, Tabouk
  جمعية البر الخيريه, Al Qaysumah
  جامع محمد بن ابراهيم ال الشيخ, Yanbu Al-Bahar
  جامع محمد بن عبد الوهاب, Buraidah
  جامع محمد حمود الفوزان,
  جامع مدينة مستور, مستور
  جامع معاذ بن جبل, Ahl Al Ash`af
  جامع الملك فهد بن عبد العزيز, Haila
  جامع المندق, Mandak
  جامع المهنا, Shagra
  جامع اليرموك, Dammam
  جامع الامام البخاري, Abha
  جامع التويجري بالسداد, Taif
  جامع الحسيكي, Baljurashi
  جامع الروضة بقرية الرمادة, Al Bahah
  جامع الريان - Al-Rayaan Mosque, Dammam
 
جامع الراجحي, Haffar El Batin

جامع الراشد, Buraidah
  جامع الرحمانية, Skaka
  جامع السوق, Kulayyah
  جامع السالمية, Riyadh
  جامع الشيخ عبدالعزيز بن باز, Ad Dilam
  جامع الظهران, Dhahran
  جامع العلامه الشيخ بن باز رحمه الله, Yanbu Al Sinaiyah
  جامع العناني, Jeddah
  جامع ابن تيمية , Dammam
  جامع ابوبكر الصديق, Yanbu al Sinaiyah
  جامع ارطاوي الكبير, Artawi ar Raqqas
  جامع خباب بن الارت, Dammam
  جامع عمر بن عبدالعزيز, Buraidah
  جامع عبدالله بن عباس, Taif
 
جامع عثمان بن عفان, Ra's At Tannurah

جمعية قيا الخيرية, Qiya
  جمعية البر الخيريه, Yanbu Al Sinaiyah
 
جمعية البر الخيرية, Alras

  Pakistan International School,Buraydah, Buraidah
  Qassim University, Buraidah
  UMM AL-QURA UNIVERSITY, Makkah
  كلية ينبع الصناعية, Yanbu Al Sinaiyah
  مجمع حلق جامع عمر بن عبدالعزيز بالبشر, Buraidah
  مدرسة الإمام حفص, Taif
  مدرسة الإمام عاصم لتحفيظ القرآن الكريم بالطائف, Taif
  ZamZam Arabic Language Insitute , Makkah
  المركز الصيفي لتحفيظ القرآن الكريم بمجمع الأميرسلطان, Jeddah
  المعهد العلمي العالي لإعداد معلمات القرآن والسنة (نساء), Jeddah
  الجمعية الخيرية لتحفيظ القرآن الكريم, Taif
  جامعة الملك عبد العزيز, Jeddah
  جامعة الامام محمد بن سعود الإسلامية, Riyadh
 
دار أم المؤمنين صفية رضي الله عنها بحي الضاحي ببريدة, Buraidah

   Muslim Owned Business

AL MIRKAZ halls for events, Riyadh
  Al Shifa Healthy Mineral Water Factory, Dammam
  Al-Khafji Joint Operations, Al Khafji
  Al-Muayed Est. Trading & Contracting, Riyadh
  AL-NASER TRAVEL, TOUR & UMRAH CO., Jeddah
  AL-Rajhi Banking & Investment Corp, Riyadh
  Albilad bank, Riyadh
  Aleaf Asia (Saudi Arabia), Riyadh
  AlSamer Gas Station, Afif
  Daar Al-Amaanah for Research, Information & Translation, Riyadh
  DALLAH ALBARAKAH GROUP., Jeddah
  Dar Al Riyadh Consultants, Yanbu
  Dar Alhijra for Islamic Books, Dammam
  Desert Store Islamic Clothing, Jeddah
  Dr. Sulaiman Al Habib Medical Center, Riyadh
  Dr.Al Subaie, Mohammed A, Riyadh
  Dr.ArRajehi, Abdullah N., Riyadh
  ELAF TRAVEL AND TOURISM, Jeddah
  FIRST DRUG COMPANY LIMITED (PHARMACY-1), Riyadh
  Medina Date Farms, Madina
  PC-ARTS فنون الحاسب والاتصالات, Jeddah
  Riyadh Group, Makkah
  Saudi Arabian Oil Company (Saudi Aramco), ZULUF
  Tabungan Amanah Islami (TAMI), Makkah Al Mukarramah
  Twaif Al Amani Trading Establishment, Riyad
  مكتبة التدمرية, Riyadh
  مكتبة ابن الجوزي بالدمام, Khobar
  مكتبةالراية, Riyadh
  موسسة الحرمين الخيرية, ABQAIQ
  مؤسسة عمر للمقاولات العامة, Buraidah
  نهضة التقنية, Riyadh
  نور للعبايات, Hofuf
  WADI KASHMIR FACTORY FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, Riyadh
  wahat al-shifa polyclinic., Madina
  المؤسسة الدولية للتسويق والسياحة, Jeddah
  التسجيلات الإسلامية, Lith
  التسجيلات الإسلامية بحائل, حائل
  السلطان للعقارات, Buraidah
  تسجيلات إمام الدعوة للأشرطة الإسلامية, MAJMA`A
  تسجيلات القراء الاسلاميه, Dammam
  تسجيلات النور الإسلاميه, ALBAHAA
  تسجيلات التوحيد الاسلامية, Arar
  جامع ابن تيمية بالفايزية, Buraidah
  حلويات إكسني شكولا, Buraidah
  دار الأمانة للأبحاث والأعلام والترجمة, Riyadh
  رباعيات للاتصالات والكمبيوتر Rubaeyat Computer & Telecom., Sakakah
  ساعة العصر الإسلامية ALASR islamic watch, Riyadh
  شركة الأنهار المتميزة لخدمة حجاج الداخل, Jeddah
 

   References
Islam in Saudi Arabia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam_in_Saudi_Arabia   , October, 2008).
Info please ( http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107947.html ,  October, 2008).
Islam Finder ( http://www.islamicfinder.org/cityPrayerNew.php?country=saudi_arabia   , October, 2008).
Anonymous, Documents from Representatives of Islamic Organizations in Saudi Arabia, October 2008.