ISLAM and MUSLIMS IN SOUTH KOREA

      

General Information

Republic of Korea

National name             : Taehan Min'guk

Land area                     : 37,911 sq mi (98,189 sq km)

Population (2007 est.)  : 49,044,790

Capital and largest city (2003 est.): Seoul, 10,287,847 (city proper)

Other large cities          : Pusan, 3,504,900; Inchon, 2,479,600 (part of Seoul metro. area); Taegu, 2,369,800

Monetary unit               : won

Languages                    : Korean, English widely taught

Ethnicity/race               : homogeneous (except for about 20,000 Chinese)

Religions                      : no affiliation 46%, Christian 26%, Buddhist 26%, Confucianist 1%, other 1%

Literacy rate                : 98% (2003 est.)

Economic summary      : GDP/PPP (2007 est.): $1.201 trillion; per capita $24,800. Real growth rate: 5%. Inflation: 2.5%. Unemployment: 3.3%.

  Slightly larger than Indiana, South Korea lies below the 38th parallel on the Korean peninsula. It is mountainous in the east; in the west and south are many harbors on the mainland and offshore islands.

  South Korea came into being after World War II, the result of a 1945 agreement reached by the Allies at the Potsdam Conference, making the 38th parallel the boundary between a northern zone of the Korean peninsula to be occupied by the USSR and southern zone to be controlled by U.S. forces.

  Elections were held in the U.S. zone in 1948 for a national assembly, which adopted a republican constitution and elected Syngman Rhee as the nation's president. The new republic was proclaimed on Aug. 15 and was recognized as the legal government of Korea by the UN on Dec. 12, 1948.

  On June 25, 1950, North Korean Communist forces launched a massive surprise attack on South Korea, quickly overrunning the capital, Seoul. U.S. armed intervention was ordered on June 27 by President Harry S. Truman, and on the same day the UN invoked military sanctions against North Korea. Gen. Douglas MacArthur was named commander of the UN forces. U.S. and South Korean troops fought a heroic holding action, but by the first week of August they were forced back to a 4,000-square-mile beachhead in southeast Korea. There they stood off superior North Korean forces until Sept. 15, when a major UN amphibious assault was launched deep behind Communist lines at Inchon, the port of Seoul.

  By Sept. 30, UN forces were in complete control of South Korea. They then crossed the 38th parallel and pursued retreating Communist forces into North Korea. In late October, as UN forces neared the Sino-Korean border, several hundred thousand Chinese Communist troops entered the conflict, pushing MacArthur's forces back to the border between North and South Korea. By the time truce talks began on July 10, 1951, UN forces had crossed over the parallel again and were driving back into North Korea. Cease-fire negotiations dragged on for two years before an armistice was finally signed at Panmunjom on July 27, 1953, leaving a devastated Korea in need of large-scale rehabilitation. No official peace treaty has ever been signed between the former combatants.

Islamic History and Muslims

  It is estimated that there are 45,000 native Muslim adherents in Korea,or 0.1% of South Korean population excluding resident migrant workers. Also included are returning Korean workers converted to Islam from the Middle East countries such as Saudi Arabia and the UAE
In South Korea, the Muslim population has been steadily increasing since the introduction of the faith shortly after the Korean War. The Muslim (both Korean and foreign born) community is centered around Seoul, where the first large 20th-century mosque was built in 1976 using the funds of the Malaysian Islamic Mission and other Islamic countries.
  There was a slow but evident growth of South Asian (Bangladeshi and Pakistani), Middle Eastern (i.e Iranian, Iraqi, Kuwaiti and Qatari) and Malaysian immigration to South Korea, the majority are Muslims, during the 1990s and 2000s, usually arrived as guest workers to the country.
It is believed that there is no significant presence of Islam in North Korea, where autonomous religious activity in general is almost non-existent. Despite the fact Korean Muslims are a small community, they are a part of the multi-religious fabric of Korean society, including Buddhists, Taoists, and Christians.

Early history

  The first verifiable presence of Islam in Korea dates back to the 9th century during the Unified Silla period with the arrival of Persian and Arab navigators and traders. According to numerous Muslim geographers, including the 9th-century Muslim Persian explorer and geographer Ibn Khurdadhbih, many of them settled down permanently in Korea, establishing Muslim villages. Some records indicate that many of these settlers were from Iraq. Other records suggest that a large number of the Alawi Shia faction settled in Korea. Further suggesting a Middle Eastern Muslim community in Silla are figurines of royal guardians with distinctly Persian characteristics. In turn, later many Muslims intermarried with Korean women. Some assimilation into Buddhism and Shamanism took place, owing to Korea's geographical isolation from Arabia.
Small-scale contact with predominantly Muslim peoples, particularly the Uyghurs, continued on and off. One word for Islam in Korean, hoegyo  comes from huihe ), an old Chinese name for the Uyghurs. During the late Goryeo period, there were mosques in the capital Gaeseong.] During Mongol rule in Korea the Mongols relied heavily on Uyghurs to help them run their vast empire because of Uighur literacy and Uighur experience in managing extended trading networks. At least two of those Uyghurs settled down in Korea permanently and became the progenitors of two Korean clans.
  One of those Central Asian immigrants to Korea originally came to Korea as an aide to a Mongol princess who had been sent to marry King Chungnyeol. Goryeo documents say that his original name was Samga but, after he decided to make Korea his permanent home, the king bestowed on him the Korean name of Jang Sunnyong. Jang married a Korean and became the founding ancestor of the Deoksu Jang clan. His clan produced many high officials and respected Confucian scholars over the centuries. Twenty-five generations later, around 30,000 Koreans look back to Jang Sunnyong as the grandfather of their clan. They are aware that he was not a native of Korea. Many believe that he was an Arab Muslim. However, there is no evidence of Islamic influence on Deoksu Jang family traditions. The same is true of the descendants of another Central Asian who settled down in Korea. A Central Asian (probably a Uyghur) named Seol Son fled to Korea when the Red Turban rebellion erupted near the end of the Mongol’s Yuan dynasty. He, too, married a Korean, originating a lineage called the Gyeongju Seol that claims at least 2,000 members in Korea today but shows no special signs of Muslim influence.20th-Century reintroduction

  During the Korean War, Turkey sent the second-largest number of troops (after the United States) to aid South Korea under the United Nations command. In addition to their contributions on the battlefield, the Turks also aided in humanitarian work, helping to operate war-time schools for war orphans. Shortly after the war, some Turks who were stationed in South Korea as UN peacekeepers began teaching Koreans about Islam. Early converts established the Korea Muslim Society in 1955, at which time the first South Korean mosque was erected. The Korea Muslim Society grew large enough to become the Korea Muslim Federation in 1967.
 

Early Introduction Stage

Korea was full of poverty, sorrow and pain resulted from Korean War which broke out on June 25, 1950. In such ruins of war, Islam began planting its seeds by brother Zubercoch and Abdul Rahman who participated in the Korean War as military service members of the Turkish Army of the United Nations stationed in Korea. During his service he built a Quonset hut used as Masjid, where he preached Islamic doctrine to the Korean People.

The Turkish Army taught the Korean people at the Masjid Tent built at the refugees' villages the teaching of Islamic monotheism during the Korean War, while the Korean people devoted themselves to religious lives in the dark and ruined surroundings wishing for bright future trusting Allah.
 

Preparatory State

As a first step towards an effective Islamic work in Korea, the early Muslim brothers organised a Korea Muslim society. This Islamic society elected Almarhum Muhammad Umar Kim Jin Kyu as president. Later, the leaders of the Korean Muslim were invited to visit Islamic Countries and some of the Korean Muslims were sent to Muslim College in Malaysia to be trained as future Islamic workers and leaders.

Malaysian Delegations led by Vice Minister Tunku Abdul Razak and his wife, visited the site of the proposed masjid. Later on Haji Mohammad Nuh, a Malaysian government officer, saw that a permanent base should be erected to carry out dawah activities.

So, with the Malaysian government's donation of $33,000, he handed over the money to the Korean Muslim Community to build a masjid in 1963. Unfortunately, the construction of the masjid could not be completed due to various reasons among them were the inflation.
 

Settled Stage

It was not an easy task to make a base for dawah activities. Many difficulties had to be endured and solved. But despite all these, the dedicated early Muslims tried very hard to promote Islam, with full faith in the One and Only God. They were successful in converting the Korean Islam into Korean Islamic Foundation which was approved by the Korean Government and was officially registered at the Ministry of Culture and Information. (Registration no. 114, March 13, 1967)

Thus, Korean Muslim began to make ways for active dawah work and managed to open a new era for Muslims in Korea with the will of Allah.
 

Take Off State

The Korean Muslims' long dream, the construction of Central Masjid was materialized in 1976. The opening of Central Masjid and Islam Center were the most important turning points for the history of Korean Muslims. At the opening ceremony, 55 representatives of around 20 countries glorified the dream of Korean Muslims, and the magnificent opening ceremony served as an outburst of sudden increase in the number of Korean Muslims.

The opening of the first Masjid of Korea contributed to rapid development of Islam in Korea. Foreign Dignitaries (V.I.P) who participated in the ceremony visited the then Prime Minister Choi Gyu Hwa to perform a role of raising the interest in Islam.

In the mean time , the Korean Muslim's mission had made pilgrimage to Mecca to inspire the people with the Islamic belief and to perform faithful duties in 1979, and the Korean Muslims spurred the propagation activities in Korea taking the opportunity of so called "Boom of Middle East"(1974-1980) by raising the interest in the Middle East and Islam.
 

Pilgrimage to the Holy Land

The Korean Muslims are not lazy in making pilgrimage to the holy land, one of the 5 Duties of Islam. Every year the Korean Muslims perform the holy duty by organizing the pilgrims group. The first pilgrimage was led by Haji Subri Seo Jung Gil in 1960. One of the largest groups ever performed Hajj was in 1978 with 130 person in 1979, 104 persons managed to perform the pilgrimage.

Today

  In 1962 the Malaysian government offered a grant of US$ 33,000 for a mosque to be built in Seoul. However, the plan was derailed due to inflation. It was not until the 1970s, when South Korea's economic ties with many Middle Eastern countries became prominent, that interest in Islam began to rise again. Some Koreans working in Saudi Arabia converted to Islam; when they completed their term of labour and returned to Korea, they bolstered the number of indigeneous Muslims. The Seoul Central Mosque was finally built in Seoul's Itaewon neighborhood in 1976. Today there are also mosques in Busan, Anyang, Gwangju, Jeonju and Daegu. According to Lee Hee-Soo (Yi Hui-su), president of the Korea Islam Institute, there are about 40,000 listed Muslims in South Korea, and about 10,000 are estimated to be highly active practitioners.
The Korean Muslim Foundation said that it would open the first Islamic primary school named Prince Sultan Bin Abdul Aziz Elementary School in March 2009 with the objective of helping Muslims in Korea learn about their religion through an official school curriculum. Plans are underway to open a cultural center, secondary schools and even university. Abdullah Al-Aifan, Ambassador of Saudi Arabia to Seoul, delivered $ 500,000 to KMF on behalf of the Saudi Arabian government.
  Many Korean Muslims say their different lifestyle makes them stand out more than others in society. However, their biggest concern is prejudice they feel after the 9/11 terrorist attack in 2001, when many people showed an interest in Islamic ideas, but most are ignorant about it.

Chronology

  • 1955 (September): Imam Zubercoch and Abdul Rahman, Participated in the Korean War as military service members, reached Quran for the first time in Korea.

  • 1955 (October): Korean Muslim Committee started (Umar Kim Jin Kyu as Chairman: Imam and Secretary General uhammad Yoon Doo Young)

  • 1961 (September): 14 men mission headed by Senator Ubaidulla of Malaysia stayed in Korea for 13 days.

  • 1962 (August): The Malaysian Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman donated $33,000 for the construction fund of Central Masjid of the Korean Muslim

  • 1963 (October): The Malaysian Speaker brother Haji Muhammad Noh visited Korea in (promised to propose to the Malasian government for the development of Korean Muslim)

  • 1967 (March): Korea Islam Foundation approved by Ministry of Culture and Information of Korea (Approval No. 114, March 3, 1967)(Chairman Suleiman Lee Hwa Shik), Secretary General Adul Aziz Kim Il Cho)

  • 1974 (December): Through the good offices of late President Park Jung Hee, 1,500 m2 of land was donated as building site for Central Masjid.

  • 1974 (May): Construction of Seoul Central Masjid and Islamic Center were completed and opened.

  • 1976 (December): Busan Temporary Masjid opened, Br. Kim Myung Hwan began to perform dawah work.

  • 1976 (March): Korea Islamic Cultural Centre Installed and being operated in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

  • 1978 (April): Temporary Masjid opened at Yok-ri Gwangjoo-eup, Gyunggi-do, Korea: brother Abdullah Jun Deuk Lin began to preach Islam to the people.

  • 1978 (October): The largest pilgrimage group of 132 persons went to perform the holy pilgrimage for the first time in Korean History; Kuwait Temporary Masjid opened.

  • 1980 (May): The then prime Minister Choi Gyu Hwa promised to King Khalid of Saudia Arabia to donate the land for the construction of Korea Islamic College during the joint comminique.

  • 1980 (July): 130 thousand Pyongs of land was donated for the construction of Islamic College in Yongin, Gyunggi-do, Korea.

  • 1980 (September): Opening ceremony of Pusan Al-Fatah Masjid was held

  • 1981 (June): Opening ceremony of Kwang-Ju Masjid was held

  • 1982.(August): Indonesia Branch was established

  • 1983 (August): W.A.M.Y. Seoul Regional Camp was held under the auspices of O.I.C. & W.A.M.Y.

  • 1984 (August): W.A.M.Y. Local Muslim Camp was held.

  • 1985.(July): The 1st Leadership Training Camp was held

  • 1985 (August): The 2nd W.A.M.Y. Local Muslim Camp was held

  • 1986.(April): Opening ceremony of Anyang Rabita Al-Alam Al-Islamic Masjid was held

  • 1986 (September): Opening ceremony of Jeon Joo Abu Bakr sidiq masjid was held

  • 1987 (August): 87 W.A.M.Y. Local Muslim Camp was held

  • 1988 (August): 88 W.A.M.Y. Local Muslim Camp was held

Muslims Celebrate 50 Years in Korea

It was half a century ago that two Muslims, Imam Zubercoch and Abdul Rahman, fought for peace in the Korean War as part of the UN forces and in the process introduced Islam's holy book, the Koran, to Korea. On Friday, the country celebrated the golden anniversary of their mission.

Sponsored by the Korea-Middle East Association, prominent figures in Korea's Islamic community along with foreign dignitaries and Korean lawmakers gathered to commemorate the anniversary.

Muslims came together to say evening prayers before breaking their fast during the holy month Ramadan with the “iftar” meal. Though such observances seem alien to many, Islam is said to be the fastest growing religion on earth and followed by one-fifth of the world population.

Korea now has some 100,000 Muslims, more than 30 percent of whom are Koreans. That Islamic fundamentalists were behind major terrorist acts worldwide has meant that many ordinary Muslims face discrimination. But religious leaders insist Islam is a peaceful faith.

"It's a shame that many Koreans associate Islam with terrorism. Those terrorists have nothing to do with our religion. It's wrong to say they are Islamic fundamentalists, they are just from anti-American or anti-Israeli groups. Islam's ideologies are peace, equality and brotherhood," one said.

The Korean government has tried to ensure that not all Muslims are tarred with the same brush. "We have established an important forum, the Korea-Middle East Forum, and we have held two conferences already,” a government official said. The anniversary “provides a very important platform and opportunity for people, academics and journalists to exchange views and appreciate the history and culture and religions of Koreans and Muslims."

Korea is putting on exhibitions of Islamic art, cultural performances and friendly football matches, film screenings and food festivals to deepen ties between non-Muslims in Korea and the Islamic world.

Arirang News

 

Seoul Central Mosque

Pusan Mosque

 

Chun-Ju Mosque

Kwangju Mosque

 

 

 

An interview with 'Ayesha Kim, a Korean Convert to Islam


Ayesha Kim belongs to Korea. She is a steadfast and resolute lady, soft at heart and strong of will. She had been struggling in search of Truth when the golden rays of Islam touched her heart. Ever since she has moved farther and farther on the road to Islam. Today she is known by her Islamic name Ayesha. She has become a lighthouse of faith for the ladies of Korea, and in particular for the girl students of that country. She guides them towards the path of Truth. Islam first came to her husband, Imam Mahdevoon, who is now the head of the Union of Muslim in South Korea. Inwardly, however, Ayesha was ahead of him in this matter. They both have started together to traverse the path of Truth.

Ayesha was able to discover truth in the thick of the devastating war that was raging when she chose Islam for her religion. She adopted the Islamic name Ayesha after the name of the noble wife of the Prophet [Sallallahu Alaihi Wa Sallam / peace be upon him]. She thought that it would be a source of blessing for her. She says: "In the face of ever expanding ideological onslaught of the Missionaries in Korea, it was in Islam that I found the truth of assured certainty."

Ayesha was interviewed for one-and-a-half hour in the Korean Islamic Cultural Centre in Jeddah. She was transiting there together with Korean girl students on their way back from Makkah after performing 'Umrah. When she was asked about her early involvement with Islam, she first kept quiet and closed her eyes, as if she was trying to look for something hidden in the deep recesses of her heart. She then became alert and after heaving a deep breath, said:

"The story of my attachment with Islam is prompting me to look back to those early days which I passed in Korea. I belonged to an orthodox family of staunch followers of an ancient Chinese religion. Korea was run down by war. I was then married to Imam Mahdevoon and we both, the husband and wife, were still away from Islam. I had, however, always an inner feeling that we were away from the reality."

The desire for Truth intensifies

"On reaching Korea," continued Ayesha, "I became all the more restless in my heart pinning to know the Truth. My inner voice was prompting me that there was one and only way to reach the Truth; and it was different from all those religions that I had till then came to know about.

"At that time the Korean War burst which compelled us again to be on the move, but this time the journey was within the country. We moved from the South of Korea towards its western seaside up to the port of Pusan. As soon as we came to an end, I told my husband that Faith was the only fortress to save ourselves as well as the society.

"We had a friend called Omar Kim," she said, "he is now dead. He had embraced Islam publicly. He spoke to us when the war was still going on, urging us for the preaching and propagation of Islam and to invite people to accept it. Our mind was influenced by Omar too. Besides, as a result of war, the country was breaking up, not only economically but also morally. False belief and superstitions were at the root of this turmoil. Such were the pitiable conditions then prevailing."

When asked as to what did she think of the worries of her husband before his acceptance of Islam, she smiled and said:
"When my husband consulted me in this regard, I asked him whether it had not dawned on him already that Islam is the only way to guidance? But he was victim of some unknown fear and apprehension. He was worried as to how shall we two live together thereafter. I told him that when he would accept Islam, God-willing, he shall find me going with him."

"These words came in very firm tone out of the very depth of my heart. My husband was, therefore, taken by surprise, realizing that I was ahead of him in accepting the Truth."

"Our friend Omar and my husband got introduced to several members of the Turkish troops that were then posted in Korea. Every day they would go to meet them some 20 kilometres from Seoul. At long last, the day came when our painful plodding reached its welcome climax. It was on a Friday in the summer of 1955. My husband, in the presence of the Turkish Imam Abdur-Rahman, accepted Islam at the hands of Zuber Kochi and offered Friday prayer. Both these gentlemen belonged to the Turkish troops."

About children

After this, she directed attention towards her children. She said, "I have only two daughters. I was apprehending difficulty about them, but I realised that after all we, too, had remained away from Islam for long. Nature itself guides. My elder daughter was then 25 years old. She said, 'My heart? It beats in unison with yours, but for the time being I would rather keep quiet until you procure maximum possible information about Islam.'

After some time, she too accepted Islam. Her name was changed from Yoong to Jamila. She was married to a Korean Muslim. My younger daughter accepted Islam at the age of 20. She too was married to a Korean Muslim. She lives in Korea near us.
      
"As for my own family, I have entrusted the whole matter to Allah. May He grant me success in bringing them into the fold of Islam. Despite my meagre means, I have maintained these relations according to Islamic principles.

Da'wah and Tableegh

"I have induced many Korean women to accept Islam. I have made them understand how Islam protects the mutual rights of married couples, and how sound is the foundation it provides for family life. All praise be to Allah, I have succeeded in guiding a large number of women to the path of Truth. We arrange get-together for ladies newly converted to Islam.

"I myself can speak Arabic with great difficulty, because I began late to learn it. To learn Arabic is a difficult question for newly converted Muslim ladies. To overcome this difficulty, we are trying to establish a Department of Arabic in the Islamic Cultural Centre of Korea."

"Another difficulty is that newly converted Muslim girls have to live in a society in which the majority religion has the upper hand. For this reason, in order to keep up the spirit of these girls, it is essential to organise their effective defence. This defence can come only through Muslim educational institutions."

"For the beginning and as of now, Muslim women in Korea are organised in Seoul only. Welfare meetings are held by them to chalk out programmes for providing assistance to the poor. We have many instances of this. Several newly-wed Muslim couples have dedicated themselves to take the message of Islam to people at large."

Hope for the Future

When asked about her last wish in her advanced age, she said, "All praise be to Allah! My husband, my children and myself, all have accepted Islam. We have performed Hajj and 'Umrah several times. My first pilgrimage tour took place in 1978 when I also took the opportunity to try to understand how life goes on in the Muslim community. Now that I am returning from Saudi Arabia to Korea, I am leaving my heart behind. There is an abiding desire to pay never ending visits to the City of the Noble Prophet, upon him be Allah's blessings and peace."

At the end of the interview, good wishes were extended to her for all success in her noble mission, and it was concluded on the Qur'anic Verse:"If Allah helps you, none can overcome you..." (3:160).

From: Yes I Converted to Islam and here is why
 

Tuesday : 15/04/2003

Ahead of Iraq Deployment, 37 Korean Troops Convert to Islam - DIGIT

http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200405/200405280041.html

"I became a Muslim because I felt Islam was more humanistic and peaceful than other religions. And if you can religiously connect with the locals, I think it could be a big help in carrying out our peace reconstruction mission." So said on Friday those Korean soldiers who converted to Islam ahead of their late July deployment to the Kurdish city of Irbil in northern Iraq.

At noon Friday, 37 members of the Iraq-bound "Zaitun Unit," including Lieutenant Son Hyeon-ju of the Special Forces 11th Brigade, made their way to a mosque in Hannam-dong, Seoul and held a conversion ceremony. Captain Son Jin-gu from Zaitoon Unit recites an oath at ceremony to mark his conversion to Islam at a mosque in Hannam-dong, Seoul on Friday. /Yonhap

The soldiers, who cleansed their entire bodies in accordance with Islamic tradition, made their conversion during the Friday group prayers  at the mosque, with the assistance of the "imam," or prayer leader.

With the exception of the imam, all the Muslims and the Korean soldiers stood in a straight line to symbolize how all are equal before God and took a profession on faith.

They had memorized the Arabic confession, " Ashadu an La ilaha il Allah, Muhammad-ur-Rasool-Allah," which means, "I testify that there is no god but God (Arabic: Allah), and Muhammad is the Messenger of God." Soldiers from Zaitoon Unit pray after conversion ceremony at a mosque in Hannam-dong, Seoul on Friday./Yonhap

Moreover, as the faithful face the "Kaaba," the Islamic holy place in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, all Muslims confirm that they are brothers.

For those Korean soldiers who entered the Islamic faith, recent chances provided by the Zaitun Unit to come into contact with Islam proved decisive.

Taking into consideration the fact that most of the inhabitants of Irbil are Muslims, the unit sent its unreligious members to the Hannam-dong mosque so that they could come to understand Islam. Some of those who participated in the program were entranced by Islam and decided to convert.

A unit official said the soldiers were inspired by how important religious homogeneity was considered in the Muslim World; if you share religion, you are treated not as a foreigner, but as a local, and Muslims do not attack Muslim women even in war.

Zaitun Unit Corporal Paek Seong-uk (22) of the Army's 11th Division said, "I majored in Arabic in college and upon coming across the Quran, I had much interest in Islam, and I made up my mind to become a Muslim during this religious experience period [provided by the Zaitun Unit]."

He expressed his aspirations. "If we are sent to Iraq, I want to participate in religious ceremonies with the locals so that they can feel brotherly love and convince them that the Korean troops are not an army of occupation but a force deployed to provide humanitarian support."

Spreading Islam's Message of Peace

By Kim Ki-tae
Staff Reporter
02-27-2006 17:14

http://times.hankooki.com/lpage/culture/200602/kt2006022717151111690.htm

Sulaiman Lee Haeng-lae, imam of Seoul Central Mosque
/Korea TImes Photo by Shim Hyun-chul

Few know that Islam in Korea has a history of affinity dating back thousands of years. It was the Muslims who recognized the presence of Silla (57 B.C.-935) out of Asia. An Arabic geographer, al-Idrisi, drew Korea's ancient kingdom on his atlas in 1154.

People of Koryo and early Choson kingdoms also actively sought Muslims from the Middle East and let them form communities around the capitals. Korean monarchs and aristocrats gave backing to the religion, and Muslims held religious service even at the palaces. The relations were amicable, albeit not very close due to geographical reasons, until hard-line Confucians took power during the Choson Kingdom and suppressed other religions.

Once parted, the two cultures seem to have a large gap for hundreds of years. Lack of knowledge often has often brought lack of understanding. Prejudice about ``belligerent'' Islam as a religion ``spread by the sword'' took root in the sentiment of some Koreans.

The tragic killing of Kim Sun-il, South Korean interpreter in Iraq in 2004, somehow fanned the prejudice. Even though the Korea Muslim Federation expressed ``deep sorrow'' at the time, mosques in Korea got several threatening phone calls.

``It's getting better. People have been raising their awareness of our beliefs so much,'' said Sulaiman Lee Haeng-lae, imam of Seoul Central Mosque during an interview with The Korea Times at the mosque last week.

``It was sorrowful for us to see some people unduly associate Islam with political implications. However, people are beginning to understand that Islam is a religion of peace and conciliation,'' the imam said.

In the context, the clergy made it clear that the religion keeps a strict distance from terrorism. ``As known, we Muslims condemn terrorism and suicide. We view the terrorists as politicians rather than Muslims,'' he said.

``In history, many politicians claimed religion as the cause of wars they started, because they could not confess that they were fighting for their own interests. In that context, religions were in many occasions forced to sacrifice for politics,'' Lee said.

Accordingly, the 69-year-old clergyman asked terrorist groups around the world to turn to nonviolent and nonresistant measures. ``They need to be convinced that we cannot control the evil by an evil measure. It should be done by the good measure.''

Lee also made no bones about his criticism of ``Western Powers.'' ``It is apparent that terrorism shall never be justified or encouraged, but on the other side we shall observe the sad history of the Middle East under the influence of Western Powers,'' he noted. ``They shall bear a certain responsibility for the cause of terrorism.'' ``Why do people commit suicide bearing bombs in the Middle East? They are definitely to blame. However, at the same time, we need to understand why they are doing such an act,'' he said. Regarding the controversy over the ``blasphemous'' Danish cartoon, the clergy took a cautious, but strict, position. ``It is inappropriate behavior for them to describe Prophet Muhammad as a terrorist,'' he said.

Lee said the cartoon is also based on false stereotypes about the religion and the prophet. ``On the contrary, the prophet spread messages of peace and equality around 1,400 years ago when every ruler wielded their powers to kill people,'' Lee said.

Even worse, Islam strictly bans recreations of Muhammad's image. ``The prophet ordered not to paint his image for fear that he might be deified later. However, the Danish newspaper unduly depicts his image,'' the imam said.

Lee entered the belief at the suggestion of a friend in 1961 when he was a university student majoring in Korean literature. After serving as an official for three decades in Korean mosques, he became imam in 1991.

Korea now has around 100,000 foreign Muslims and some 35,000 Korean Muslims, Lee said.

kkt@koreatimes.co.kr

02-27-2006 17:14


Muslim Community Gets New Recognition

By Yoon Won-sup Staff Reporter

Most Muslims living in Korea think that South Korean people’s general level of understanding about Islam improved a lot after the 9/11 attack. However, there is still a long way to go before Koreans fully understand what Islam is, according to Muslims here.
``Since the 9/11 terrorist attack, so many Koreans have visited our mosque to satisfy their curiosity about Islam that we started giving open lectures on Islam to the public in the weekend,’’ said Abdul Raziq Sohn, president of the Korea Muslim Federation.

Sohn said that as Seoul Central Mosque in Itaewon is the only mosque in Seoul, it became a kind of tourist destination for non-Muslims to come and learn Islam on Saturday and Sunday.

Actually, if you walk down the main street of Itaewon around noon on Friday, it is easy to find the way to Seoul Central Mosque because so many Muslims go to the mosque as a group or on their own.

Every Friday, about 800 Muslims get together to pray at the Seoul Central Mosque, most of whom are foreign Muslims working here as diplomats, businessmen, migrant workers or students. The Friday prayer at the mosque is, therefore, a time when Muslims gather for a weekly meeting.

Sohn, who also teaches Arabic at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, said most Koreans now have basic knowledge of Islam due to Sept. 11 and its aftermath but noted that there is still a lot of prejudice and misunderstandings about Islam.

Raja Saifful Ridzuwan, second secretary of the Malaysian Embassy in Seoul, echoed the same view by giving examples.

``Sometimes I am served a pork dish by Koreans who know that I am Muslim,’’ Ridzuwan said, pointing out many Koreans’ basic lack of knowledge that Muslims do not eat pork.

In addition to lack of knowledge, the Malaysian diplomat also indicated Koreans’ lack of understanding of other religions and cultures.

Whenever his wife, dressed in traditional Muslim costume, which covers her entire body except her face, goes shopping in downtown Seoul, she feels uncomfortable because people automatically stare at her.

A more complicated example is the story of a Muslim-Uzbek worker who came to Korea as a trainee worker under the South Korean government’s training program for Asians.

The Uzbek worker was unfortunately assigned to a pig farm even though Muslims must not raise pigs for slaughter according to their religious rules. After spending two years raising pigs, the worker called the mosque for help.

``The Uzbek worker cried and felt he had sinned by raising pigs,’’ Kim Hwan-yoon, director of audit and inspection of the federation, said. ``That kind of incident signifies Korea’s negligence over Muslims.’’

However, the more serious problem Kim pointed out was absence of a school for Muslim children in South Korea.

``Muslim children have difficulty attending a Korean primary and secondary school because they are treated like aliens in those schools just because they are Muslims,’’ Kim said.

In any Korean school where students are provided with school meals, the special diet of Muslims naturally draws attention from Korean students who know little or nothing about Islam.

In most cases, Muslim students in primary school end up being alienated from Korean friends, Kim added.

``And if Muslims go to international schools, problems still exist because most foreign schools are based on Christianity,’’ Kim said.

This problem has prompted the federation to establish a Muslim school, an idea that receives great support from the Muslim community.

Soekarddy Haji Abdullah Sani, second secretary of the Brunei Darussalam Embassy in Seoul, said, ``It is a very good idea to set up a Muslim school in Seoul.’’

Mohammad Sherazul, who came to Korea four months ago, said that he was surprised to find Koreans have little consideration for Muslims.

Sherazul remembers well the first day he worked in a Korean office in Puchon because his Korean employer criticized him for praying during work hours. Then, Sherazul explained to his boss that Muslims must pray five times a day, and he is now free to do prayer.

``Our special diet and regular prayer is not a real prejudice rooted in Koreans here,’’ he continued. ``It is understandable in the eyes of Koreans.’’

Yet, Muslims say that those examples of lack of knowledge about Islam are not the real problem because it takes only a little time for Koreans to learn Islamic rules and customs.

``The real problem is that they have a negative image of Islam, for example, that Muslims are warlike people, which is really hard to fix,’’ Kim said.

Korean-Muslims ascribed the misunderstandings of Koreans about Islam to old education, which taught that Muslims have a sword in one hand and the Koran in the other hand to conduct jihad or holy war.

It is this misunderstanding that Muslims believe brought flaming anti-Islam sentiment against Islam in Korea when South Korean interpreter Kim Sun-il was killed by Iraqi insurgents in June 2004.

The Seoul Central Mosque received lots of threatening phone calls and some men tried to enter the mosque with a sword in their hand, forcing the police to provide protection around the mosque for months.

``Islam is a peace-loving religion and there is not a single word encouraging war in Islam’s book,’’ Abdul Rahman Lee, director of education department of the federation said.

In fact, Muslims noted that jihad was wrongfully translated as holy war in English because the real definition of jihad is all the activities and effort Muslims exert in order to follow words of God.

But they saw the current boom of Islam here as a good opportunity for Koreans to better understand the religion and its 50-year history in Korea.

The federation estimates there are some 100,000 Muslims living in Korea, and about 70 or 80 percent of them are foreigners.

Sources: The Korea Times 05-29-2005

Islam Takes Root and Blooms

From Japanese colonial times, Itaewon has been a major residential area for people from abroad. It once housed Japanese army barracks, and after 1945 a large compound in the district became the property of the U.S. army. Its neighborhood developed as a magnet for all kinds of foreign residential activity in Seoul.

Itaewon is dominated by a building that is unmistakably a mosque. This impressive building is a reminder of the resurgence of the Muslim community here.

Islam has been a presence in this country for a very long time. In the 8th and 9th centuries, Arab sailors and merchants often frequented the coastal waters of South and East Asia. As early as 845 their books mentioned Korea, and did so in the most flattering of terms: ``Over the sea beyond China lies a mountainous country called `Silla,’ rich in gold. Muslims who arrive there by accident are so attracted by its character that they stay there forever and do not want to leave.’’ Indeed, at that time a number of Muslim merchants made it their home.

Some Koreans also made epic trips to the West. Records confirm that in 727 the famous Buddhist monk Heoch’o visited the Arab Near East on his way back from India.

During the Koryo period (918-1392) Kaesong, then the nation’s capital, was home to a thriving Muslim community, and there was a mosque as well. Members of one of the country’s clans, the Changs of Toksu, still recall that the clan’s founder was a Muslim who came to Korea during the Koryo era. However, the Yi dynasty, which seized power in 1392, was much more introspective than its predecessor, so these early connections with the Near East gradually withered.

The resurrection of Islam took place during the Korean War. The war was fought largely by U.S. forces, but with support from other countries, among them Turkey, at that time a close ally of Washington. The Turkish forces were among the most numerous, some 15,000 soldiers, and best trained non-American units to take part in the war.

The Turks brought Islam back to Korea. They proved to be not only good fighters but also successful missionaries. Their ``tent mosques,’’ which initially served the soldiers themselves, eventually became major centers of missionary activity. The Turks allowed and encouraged Korean converts to take part in prayers and attend services. The Turks were also engaged in large-scale humanitarian efforts, which left a favorable, lasting impression on the locals.

When the war finished and the Turkish units returned home, they left behind a small but active local Muslim community. The Korean Muslim Society was officially inaugurated in 1955. This body, later re-named the Korean Islamic Foundation, became the major organization for believers here. The society sent members overseas for religious education and tried to establish a permanent mosque with the help of a Malaysian government grant, but was unable to. Prayers were held in makeshift buildings, with minarets made of wooden planks and iron frames.

The 1960s brought a new impetus to Islam in this country. At that time a large number of Korean construction workers were dispatched to the Near East, where domestic companies were engaged in numerous projects. Some of these workers came back as converted Muslims and engaged in missionary activity among their fellows.

In the 1970s, the first permanent mosque was established in Itaewon, constructed with a grant provided by Saudi Arabia and opened in 1976. At that time it was one of the most remarkable buildings in the entire city, and is still impressive.

The number of Muslims here is estimated to be about 45,000 in addition to some 100,000 foreign workers from Muslim countries. There are six permanent mosques around the country, and in general, Islam is a growing religion here.

Sources: The Korea Times 11-22-2002

   Islamic Centers and Organizations

Organization Name

Address

Phone-Fax-Email-Web

General Information

Korea Muslim Federation

Korea Muslim Federation
732-21.hannamdong, yongsangu.seoul,
Seoul, korea(republic) 140-210, SOUTH KOREA

82 2-793-6908
82 2 793 3156
rahmanlee@hanmail.net
www.koreaislam.org

Headquater and Official Muslim Organization of Korea. Registrade and approved by gorvernment. Central Masjid.

International Muslim Student Association of Korea

International Muslim Student Association of Korea
KPO Box 1476,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

muslimkorea@hanmail.net

 

Muslim students organisation

KAIST Islamic Society

 

KAIST Islamic Society
W2 build. 2203, Bachelor\'s Residence, KAIST 373-1, Gusong-dong, Yusong-gu,
Taejon, Taejon 305-701, SOUTH KOREA

+82-10-28935326
kaistsociety@yahoo.com
http://msa.kaist.ac.kr/kis

KAIST Islamic Society (KIS) was formed by Muslim students at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) to provide a platform for the muslim students in Taejon to practice Islam with freedom. Another major objective of KIS is to perform Dawa\'ah activity to call non-muslims towards Islam.

MSA KAIST - Muslim Students Association @ Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

MSA KAIST - Muslim Students Association @ Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
KAIST, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, South Korea,
Taejon, Daejeon 303353, SOUTH KOREA

010-86851200
kaistsociety@yahoo.com
http://msa.kaist.ac.kr

The MSA is an association of all muslim students in KAIST, Daejeon. We host a number of activities and encourage all students to participate in activities of their choice by making clubs or groups on their own.

Korea Muslim federation Pusan branch and Busan Al-Fatah Masjid

Korea muslim federation Pusan branch and Busan Al-Fatah Masjid
30-1 Namsan-dong Keumjeong-ku, Pusan, Korea,
Pusan, South Korea , SOUTH KOREA

051-518-9991
051-518-9992
051-583 8812
pumitabusan@yahoo.com 
www.pumitabusan.cjb.net 

Only one Masjid in Pusan city. Imam Ismail Bu Hwang h/p: 011 562 3514.They also have computer class. Pusan branch of the Korea Muslim federation masjid & Islamic center. From another place in Pusan by subway to Station 31 ( Tusil ) and walk 5 minutes to this place. This Indonesian Moslem Activity in Pusan, especially in Pusan Al -Fatah Masjid, Collect Zakat, Infaq and Shodaqoh from jamaah and we use for da\'wah in Korea and also we send to fakir, miskin and yatim in Indonesia.

Seoul Central Mosque

Seoul Central Mosque
732-21 Hannam-dong,
Seoul, Yongsan Ku , SOUTH KOREA

82-02 793 6808
82-02-798-9782

 

Jeju Islamic cultural center

Jeju islamic cultural center
#1215,junghan officetel,939 nohyoung dong.jeju city,jejudo,
Jeju Island, korea , SOUTH KOREA

064-712 1215
064- 712-1215
islamjeju@hanmir.com
www.islamjeju.or.kr

Korea Muslim federation representative for jejudo. Islamic information center. cyber link & direct contact in Emergency case. 011-692-3932

Jeju branch of Korea Muslim Federation

Jeju branch of Korea Muslim Federation
#1208. Junghan officetel.939 Nohyoung dong, jeju city. jejudo,
Jeju, jejudo , SOUTH KOREA

064-712 1215
064 712 1215
islamcheju@paran.com
www.islamjeju.or.kr

Official representative of Korea Muslim Federation. cyber islamic information center. and Musala. Emergency case. 011 692 3932 Prof, Bashir kim

Masjid Umar Bin Khattab

Masjid Umar Bin Khattab
284-13, Yangsan-Dong, Buk-Gu, Gwangju,
Gwangju, Cholla-Namdo 500-887, SOUTH KOREA

062-972-5136
062-972-5136
gwangjumuslims@yahoo.com
http://www.quran.or.kr/gwangju/

Masjid is open on friday for juma prayer, on saturday (from maghrib to Isha) and on sunday (from 1pm to 6pm).The Muslims in Gwangju come from various countries including Korea, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkey, Tanzania, Maldives etc. Please call, fax or email to participate in any of the following activities at this mosque: Ø Juma Prayer (Every Friday at 12:30pm) Ø Get together (Every Saturday evening at 8:30pm with free dinner served) Ø Visits to Mosque (Special Islamic cultural visits arranged on request. These visits include lecture, video, food, etc) Ø Cooking classes (Recipes of various Islamic countries. Booking required.) Ø Islamic literature in Korean language is available Ø Orientation program for New Muslims

Masjid & Center AbuBakar Al-siddiq (Jeonju)

Masjid & Center AbuBakar Al-siddiq (Jeonju)
ga Inhu-dong,Duk-jin Gu, Chonju, Korea,
Jeonju, Jeonju 1567-10 2, SOUTH KOREA

0082-063-243-1483
quran@quran.or.kr
http://www.quran.or.kr/

This mosque and center is located in this area to make Dawa and invite non-muslim Koreans to understand Islam.

AL MADINA MASJED

AL MADINA MASJED
Near to cheonan bus terminal,
Cheonan, , SOUTH KOREA


010-8281-5152
041-622-1786
speedline786@hotmail.com

 

Almadina Mosque

Almadina Mosque
Near dea aa APT shinbu-dong,
Ch'onan, chungchangnam-do 330-130, SOUTH KOREA

041-556-9186
041-522-9484
abdul_nigora@yahoo.com

 

Al-Amin Islamic Centre

Al-Amin Islamic Centre
Ajin Building 4F Igok Dong 1000-255 Dalseogu, Daegu,
Daegu, Seongso , SOUTH KOREA

010-30400919
al_amintaegu@yahoo.com
www.alaminkorea.com

Indonesian Muslim Activity

Ansan masjid

Ansan masjid
kyungido ansan city danwon-ku wonkuk dong,
An-san, kyungido 741-5, SOUTH KOREA

82-(31)-492-1948
webmaster@koreaislam.org
http://www.koreaislam.org/islamhis2.php

masjid owned by muslim providing 5 prayers a day plus the tahajud and the jumaa salat u can take wodu there or even take a room in the first floor also ther is a hallal food shop .....

ANSAN MOSQUE&ISLAMIC CENTER

ANSAN MOSQUE&ISLAMIC CENTER
741-5wongok-dong,
Ansan-yok, kyunggi-do , SOUTH KOREA

031-4921948
031-4921953

 

Bilal Islamic Centre

Bilal Islamic Centre
Kongdan Sangga 402HO, 456-16 Naedong - Changwon,
Masan, Changwon , SOUTH KOREA

011-96933639
kmc_changwon@yahoo.com

We have Indonesian Moslem Community and Indonesian Halal Shop, Jumaah Pray and Sunday meeting

CHANGWON MASJID AND ISLAMIC CENTRE

CHANGWON MASJID AND ISLAMIC CENTRE
CHANGWON CITY , PALYONG DONG 17-13,
Masan, KYONGSANG NAMDO , SOUTH KOREA

017-528-5343

 

PRAYERS , ISLAMIC CENTRE , HUMAN RIGHTS , NGO ,ISLAMIC LIBRARY , ISLAMIC MISSIONS etc

Chungchong bukto Muslim commnity

Chungchong bukto Muslim commnity
haksan, yeongdong, chungchong bukto, south korea,
Yeongdeog Gun, , SOUTH KOREA

0082 (0)10 92 94 34 72

jumah namaz at the carpark at the only factory in yeongdong behind the train station talk starts at 1.00pm khutbah 1.15 and jumah namaz at 1.25 it should finish at 1.30

Daegu Islamic Center (Masjid)

Daegu Islamic Center (Masjid)
Daegu, Dalseogu, Jukjeon-dong 202-6,
Daegu, , SOUTH KOREA

+82 (053)-523-2171
+82 (053)-523-2172
info@dgislam.or.kr
www.dgislam.or.kr

Daegu Islamic Center (DIC) is a nonprofit, nonsectarian religious, educational and cultural organization. Daegu Islamic Center consists of organization: Jamia Masjid Uthman bin Affan and Daegu Institute of Islamic Studies. Services provided by the Jamia Masjid Uthman bin Affan include congregational prayers, Ramadan Iftaars and Taraveeh, a Sunday school, Eid programs, educational lectures, and interfaith activities DIIS provides a comprehensive curriculum that offers students a broad range of both academic and religious subjects, including Arabic Language, Qura’nic and Islamic Studies, and English Language.

Daegu Institute of Islamic Studies

Daegu Institute of Islamic Studies
Daegu Dalseogu Jukjeong-dong 367-6,
Daegu, 704-932, SOUTH KOREA

053-527-3143
053-527-3144
info@dgislam.or.kr
http://www.dgislam.or.kr

Islamic School

Daejeon Mosque - Islamic Center of Daejeon

Daejeon Mosque - Islamic Center of Daejeon
요성구 궁동 404-9 이층 - Yuseong-Gu Kung-Dong, 404-9 (2nd Floor), Daejeon, South Korea,
Taejon, 305-701, SOUTH KOREA

082-10-2892-3863 HP
islamic.center.daejeon@gmail.com
www.daejeonmosque.googlepages.com  

This Mussala (Islamic Centre) was built with the cooperation of Korean Muslim Foundation and all Muslims living in Daejeon and some other parts of Korea. Quran  Dars, Recitation and Translation. Islamic Study circle, Regular study circle on every.

Dongam islamic center

Dongam islamic center
Incheon kwang yok shi Shimjong 1 dong 279-9,
Tong-am, incheon , SOUTH KOREA

 

 

Jinju Islamic Center ( Korean Muslim Federation)

Jinju Islamic Center ( Korean Muslim Federation)
Jinju city, Song phyong dong, 250-7, Near Hanil hospital,
Jinju, , SOUTH KOREA

055-010-2897-7861
zauaf@hotmail.com

The name of the Musala is Mosab bin umar and it is running under Korean Muslim Federation.

Kwangju islamic center

Kwangju islamic center
kwangju kwangyok shi kwang sun gu wolgae dong 894-7 2F,
Kwangju, Chollah do , SOUTH KOREA

062-9725136

 

 

Kwangju Mosque

Kwangju Mosque
Kyongi-do kwangju-kun kwangju up yokri 48-9,
Kwangju, Kyongi-Do 464-807, SOUTH KOREA

031--761-3424

 

 

Macheon Keoyeo Islamic Center

Macheon Keoyeo Islamic Center
Seoul Shi Songpha gu Keoyeo dong 186-26,
Seoul City, Seoul , SOUTH KOREA

02-4316850

 

 

Paju Mosque

Paju Mosque
Kyongi-do Paju Shi Worlung myon yong tae ri 421-9,
Paju, Kyongi-Do 413-813, SOUTH KOREA

031-9462110

 

 

Permata Al Furqon

Permata Al Furqon
3F 263-10, Galsan-dong, Dalseo-gu, Taegu,
Taegu-si, , SOUTH KOREA

01026026099
permatataegu@yahoo.com

Alhamdulillah, Permata Al Furqon is one of Indonesian Islamic Organisation in Taegu.

Pochon Islamic center

: Pochon Islamic center
kyongi-do pochon gu Sohul up Songori 430-828,
Poch'on, Kyongi-Do , SOUTH KOREA

031-5424696

 

 

Sayyidina Umar Islamic Centre

Sayyidina Umar Islamic Centre
Kwangju City, Gwangsan-Gu, Wolgae-Dong, Building#894-7, 2nd Floor,
Kwangju, Kwangju , SOUTH KOREA

019 837 2720

 

 

Seoul Central Mosque

Seoul Central Mosque
732-21 Hannam-dong,
Seoul, Yongsan Ku , SOUTH KOREA

82-02 793 6808
82-02-798-9782

Just west of Malaysian Embassy

 

Usman Islamic Center - Masjid(Mosque)

Usman Islamic Center - Masjid(Mosque)
#202-6, Chuk Chan-dong, Dalseo-gu,
Taegu, , SOUTH KOREA

053-523-2171

Jamia Masjid Usman Islamic Center, the only place(Mosque) in Daegu where Jumua'ah prayer is offered.Qur'anic classes on Sundays

Yeungnam University Mosque

Yeungnam University Mosque
Room no. 313, Analysis center, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712749, South Korea,
Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbukdo 712749, SOUTH KOREA

010-5188-3975
kmotiur@yahoo.com

This is a Mosque where we can Pray 5 times alhamdulillah. Established from March 2007 granted by Yeungnam University Administration. Prayesr times changed according to season except Isha and Juma prayers (see activites section)

Ali Mola Org.

Ali Mola Org.
Pupyung ku,Shipjung2 dong 578-7,
Inch'on, Gyeonggi-do , SOUTH KOREA

82-011 419-5319
alishahbaba@yahoo.com

Islamic centre and Islamic services

 

ICU Islamic Society

ICU Islamic Society
119, Munjiro, Yuseong-gu, Taejon, 305-732,
Taejon, Taejon , SOUTH KOREA

010-58258209
bbakitnur@gmail.com
http://muslimicu.wordpress.com

The student club in ICU, for muslim society

 

Ikatan Muslim Tongyeong

Ikatan Muslim Tongyeong
445, Inpyeong dong,
Tongyeong Gun, South Korea 650-160, SOUTH KOREA

055-646-4766
055-644-4766
ali.wanda@gmail.com

 

KYONGNAM MOSLEM COMMUNITY

KYONGNAM MOSLEM COMMUNITY
Kongdan Sangga 402 ho 456-16, Naedong-Changwon, Kyongnamdo,
Changwon, Changwon , SOUTH KOREA

011-9693-3639
kmc_changwon@yahoo.com 

Indonesian Moslem Activity and Indonesian Halal Shop

Muslim contact

Muslim contact
Samsung Shipyard,
Geoje Do, , SOUTH KOREA

01028935326
ihsanjut@yahoo.com

Communication among Muslims in Geoje city and surroundings

Quran.or.kr

Quran.or.kr
KPO Box 1721,
Seoul, Seoul 110-617, SOUTH KOREA

quran@quran.or.kr
http://www.quran.or.kr

Promoting the education of The Holy Quran in Korea

The Family of Indonesian Moslem Organization in Korea ( IKMI : Ikatan Keluarga Muslim Indonesia)

The Family of Indonesian Moslem Organization in Korea ( IKMI : Ikatan Keluarga Muslim Indonesia)
Seoul, , South Korea

ikmi_korea@yahoo.com

 

Muhammad Salafudin (Chairman of IKMI-Korea) Mobil Number : 82-11-9689-9100 E-mail : rah_miraj@yahoo.com Heri Budiono (Secretary) Mobil Number : 82-10-3141-8485 E-mail : ono_herry@yahoo.com

The Family of Indonesian Moslem Organization in Korea ( IKMI ) is the Indonesian moslem organization in Korea that contain of Indonesian peoples and make a service for all Indonesia Muslim in Korea. And Alhamdulillah, at 7 Ramadhan 1425 H, we open the Musholla in Guro City and its a part one of Korean Muslim Federation Branch. Address of Musholla " Al-Falah " IKMI-Korea : Seoul-si Guro-ku Guro Bondong 505 No.20 ( Near in Guro Station, Seoul, morethan 200 metres )

 

 

 

 

  Muslim Owned Business

Organization Name

Address

Phone-Fax-Email-Web

General Information

AISHA INTERNATIONAL TRADERS CO., LTD.

AISHA INTERNATIONAL TRADERS CO., LTD.
402-23 GIL-1 DONG KU SEOUL SEOUTH KOREA,
Seoul, SEOUL 134-010, SOUTH KOREA

82-2-489-5213
82-2-471-9112
aishaint@yahoo.com

WE ARE A RETAIL/WHOLESELLER OF HALAL FOOD IN SOUTH KOREA. WE ALSO EXPORTING USED CLOTHING TO VARIOUS COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD.

AISHA TRADING CO.,LTD

AISHA TRADING CO.,LTD
bisan7dong 880-5seogu taegusouthkorea,
Taegu, 70382, SOUTH KOREA

053-3532354-
053-3532315
sea_raja2353@yahoo.com

all kind of asian halal food is available and aslo all kind of import and export contact AbdulRehman hand ph:0166042353

HARAMAIN INT CO LTD

HARAMAIN INT CO LTD
302 SESOON BUILDING 376-15 sogyo dong mapo gu,
Seoul, KHYNGGI DO 121-210, SOUTH KOREA

0082-10-5895-0786
82 02 792-1786
mitha_mahea74@hotmail.com

Trading business,general inquiries,business information guied the all forigner and muslim brother in south korea. we are importer and exporte to all over the world.and we can do all services for muslim brother in korea.and also we can do all business inquieries.please send the mail for any information from korea.and we can do the accomodation and provoied halal food.

ADAM PUBLISHING HOUSE

ADAM PUBLISHING HOUSE
137-46 ITAEWON DONG, YONGSAN GU,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

82-1044400967
8262806455
muneer786@hotmail.com

PUBLISHING ISLAMIC BOOKS

 

Afridi International Co.

Afridi International Co.
#417-5 Nae Dang-Dong, Seo-Gu,
Taegu, 705-394, SOUTH KOREA

82-53-551-9312
82-53-561-9211

Information: Mainly exports textile products from Korea to Pakistan, Iran, Afganistan.

 

Afzal halal food

Afzal halal food
Jinju city, Song phyong dong,
Jinju, , SOUTH KOREA

055-010-2328-0740

 

halal food

 

AL ASR CORPORATION LTD

AL ASR CORPORATION LTD
153-2 Seongsan Hawan Dalseong,
Daegu, , SOUTH KOREA

010-8217-5123
053-635-6123
trading2010@yahoo.com

WE ARE LOCATED NEAR HAWAN PARK ,YOU CAN COME BY GUMA EXPRESS WAY AND COME OUT FROM HAWAN INTERCHANGE.FOR FURTHER ASSISTENC CALL US FREELY.

AL MADINA HALAL FOOD

AL MADINA HALAL FOOD
Jinju City - Jinju,
Jinju, kHANGNUM DO , SOUTH KOREA

010-22519871
055-763-7606
shamee74@yahoo.com

We also deliver Halal Food to areas near JinJu City as well. One stop shop for all halal food items and calling cards to your home countries. Call on mobile for details. Halal Food Shop All type of meat All type of Spices All Asian Food Item available Calling Cards

ALZEER TRADING CO.

ALZEER TRADING CO.
Daegu- Buk Gu HakJeong Dong 936-6 302,
Daegu, , SOUTH KOREA

053-010-5129-1972
053-355-1972
Alzeer_trading_group@yahoo.com

Export Korean Cars and It is Spare Parts

AMAN REHMAT TRADING CO,LTD

AMAN REHMAT TRADING CO,LTD
#1090-4 JUNG RI DONG SEOGU DAEGU KOREA,
Daegu, KOREA SOUHT 703-090, SOUTH KOREA

82-016-892-3665 / 05
053-521-1754
shanalam31@hotmail.com

textile exporters &importers

 

AnChem Global Trade

AnChem Global Trade
P.O.Box 94 Sodeamun Gu Seoul,
Seoul, 120-600, SOUTH KOREA

8210-31466506
822-3739605
anchemglobal@yahoo.com

xporter of Used electronics,Refrigrator's washer,microwave,sound stereo,bikes, Desk top computers Hard disk,cdma phone from korea. Any information need about Korea feel free contact us.

BUSITECH TRADING INTERNATIONAL CO.,LTD

BUSITECH TRADING INTERNATIONAL CO.,LTD
HANNAM DONG,YONGSAN GU,
Seoul, SEOUL , SOUTH KOREA

01050147603
032-584-7604
busitech2000@live.com

Exporters of Textile Machinery, Heavy Construction Equipments & Machineries, Computer Peripherials & Generators,Ups,Etc.

Carland Trading Company

Carland Trading Company
#2427 Daejeo2- dong Gangseo-gu, Busan, Korea.,
Pusan, Busan 664885, SOUTH KOREA


051-9412663
0519412664
car_lnd@yahoo.com
www.carlandkorea.com

Selling And Exporting used car and car parts to Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Palestine, Sudan and other countries

Evergreen Restaurant

Evergreen Restaurant
2nd. Floor, 131-20, Itaewon-1-Dong,,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

7907773

Halal Restaurant

 

Halal

Halal
22-3, 2nd Floor, Itaewon-1 Dong, Yongsong-Gu,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

793-7644-7643

 

Halal Restaurant

Halal Food

Halal Food
Kaist,
Taejon, Daejeon 305-701, SOUTH KOREA

+82-10-6875-2664
uafraza@hotmail.com
http://143.248.227.175/kis1

Halal meat and other south Asian eatables available

HARAMAIN INT CO LTD

HARAMAIN INT CO LTD
302 SESOON BUILDING 376-15 sogyo dong mapo gu,
Seoul, KHYNGGI DO 121-210, SOUTH KOREA

0082-10-5895-0786
82 02 792-1786
mitha_mahea74@hotmail.com

we are importer and exporter to all over the world and we can do all services for Muslim brother in Korea and also we can do all business inquiries. please send the mail for any information from Korea and we can do the accommodation and provided halal food.

ISLAMIC BOOKCENTER

ISLAMIC BOOKCENTER
137-46 ITAEWON DONG, YONGSAN GU,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

0082-1044400967
008262806455
muneer786@hotmail.com

ISLAMIC BOOKS AND RELATED PRODUCTS(PERFUMES,MP3S,HIJABS,PRAYER MATS, CAPS)

J.R INTERNATIONAL TRADING CO.

J.R INTERNATIONAL TRADING CO.
152-2 GAMEON DONG,SASANG-GU,PUSAN,
Pusan, , SOUTH KOREA

051-322 6080
051 328 3878
H/P 011 9554 1352

All kinds import & export & supply halal food. contact mr, shaikh rais 011 9554 1352

JUKSAN MACHINERY CO LTD

JUKSAN MACHINERY CO LTD
RM-405, #95-1, ILWOO BLD,CHUNGMORO4GA,,
Seoul, SEOUL 100863, SOUTH KOREA

02-22774582
02-22774585
juksana@chollian.net
www.juksana.com

Dealing in textile and printing machinery

Mars Enterprises Co.,Ltd

Mars Enterprises Co.,Ltd
Changwon City,Daewon Dong,29-6,
Masan, Kyong Sang Namdo 641-200, SOUTH KOREA

017-528-5342~3
055)237-5342
marsltd@ec21.com

We are importers and exporters. We are one stop 100% Halal shop (food stuff).

 

MISCO CORPORATION LIMITED

MISCO CORPORATION LIMITED
SUIT NO. 402, KUMHO BUILDING, # 200-23, SOONGIN-DONG, JONGNO-GU,,
Seoul, Seoul 110-825, SOUTH KOREA

82-2-2233-5920
82-2-2235-5921
www.miscocorp@kornet.net

 

Moghul

Moghul
Behind Hamilton Hotel Store, Itaewon,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

02-796-5501

Halal Restaurant

MUHAMAD ALLY.KIM,CHUL

MUHAMAD ALLY.KIM,CHUL
K.M.F. C.P.O. BOX 2904,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

011-232 1495 OR 798

 

supply all halal meat.

 

RESTAURANT USMANIA

RESTAURANT USMANIA
119-7 , ITAEWON-DONG , YONGSAN -GU,
Seoul City, 140-200, SOUTH KOREA

822-79871557
yasir512us@hotmail.com

THERE ARE A FEW MUSLIM RESTAURANTS NEARBY . THERE IS ALSO A MUSLIM GROCERY STORE . THE FOOD IS GOOD AND THEY HAVE BUFFETS ON FRIDAY NIGHTS , SAT AFTERNOONS AND SUNDAY AFTERNOONS AT ABOUT US$18. CHEAPER FOOD AVAILABLE ON A LA CARTE.

Sajal Foreign Exchange

Sajal Foreign Exchange
Near Dong Incheon Station,Gate # 4,
Incheon, , SOUTH KOREA

032-777-8043
032-7778042
sfe_korea@yahoo.com

 

Salam Turkish

Salam Turkish
Zakee Jeong,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

793-4323

 

Halal Restaurant

 

Shop

Shop
717-22 Jungri Dong, Seogu, Daegu,
Taegu, , SOUTH KOREA


053-522-6728
053-523-6728

Halal Food Shop

 

Taj Mahal

Taj Mahal
132-2 Iteawon-dong, Yongsan-Ku,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

02-749-0316

 

Halal Restaurant

Taqwa Tandoori Restaurant

Taqwa Tandoori Restaurant
131-36, Yangsang-gu, Iteawon-dong,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

02-792-1448

 

Halal Restaurant

 

Usmania

Usmania
119-7. Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-Gu, 140-200,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

02-798-7155

 

Halal Restaurant

 

WAZWAN Restaurant

WAZWAN Restaurant
732-151, Hanamdong Yongsangu, Seoul, Korea,
Seoul, , SOUTH KOREA

02-798 1253
02-798 1257
rahat1495@yahoo.com
http://wazwan.50megs.com

Serving Halal Indian Food.

 

 

 

 

  References
Islam in South Korea ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam_in_Korea   , June, 2008).
Info please ( http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107690.html ,  June, 2008).
Islam Finder ( http://www.islamicfinder.org/cityPrayerNew.php?country=south_korea   , June, 2008).
Anonymous, Documents from Representatives of Islamic Organizations in South Korea
, June 2008.