ISLAM and MUSLIMS IN SLOVENIA

      

General Information

Republic of Slovenia

National name: Republika Slovenija

Land area: 7,780 sq mi (20,151 sq km); total area: 7,827 sq mi (20,273 sq km)

Population (2007 est.): 2,009,245

Capital and largest city (2003 est.): Ljubljana, 258,000

Other large city: Maribor, 92,400

Monetary units: Slovenian tolar; euro (as of 1/1/07)

Languages: Slovenian 91%, Serbo-Croatian 5% (2002)

Ethnicity/race: Slovene 93.1%, Croat 1.8%, Serb 2%, Bosniak 1.1%, other or unspecified 12% (2001)

Religions: Catholic 58% Orthodox 2%, other Christian 1%, Islam 2%, none 10%

Literacy rate: 100% (2003 est.)

Economic summary: GDP/PPP (2007 est.): $54.67 billion; per capita $27,200. Real growth rate: 6.1%. Inflation: 3.6%.

Slovenia occupies an area about the size of the state of Massachusetts. It is largely a mountainous republic and almost half of the land is forested, with hilly plains spread across the central and eastern regions. Mount Triglav, the highest peak, rises to 9,393 ft (2,864 m).

Slovenia was originally settled by Illyrian and Celtic peoples. It became part of the Roman Empire in the first century B.C.

The Slovenes were a south Slavic group that settled in the region in the 6th century A.D. During the 7th century, the Slavs established the state of Samu, which owed its allegiance to the Avars, who dominated the Hungarian plain until Charlemagne defeated them in the late 8th century.

When the Hungarians were defeated by the Turks in 1526, Hungary accepted Austrian Hapsburg rule in order to escape Turkish domination; the Hapsburg monarchy was the first to include all of the Slovene regions. Thus, Slovenia and Croatia became part of the Austro-Hungarian kingdom when the dual monarchy was established in 1867. Like Croatia and unlike the other Balkan states, it is primarily Roman Catholic.

Following the defeat and collapse of Austria-Hungary in World War I, Slovenia declared its independence. It formally joined with Montenegro, Serbia, and Croatia on Dec. 4, 1918, to form the new nation called the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes. The name was later changed to Yugoslavia in 1929.

During World War II, Germany occupied Yugoslavia, and Slovenia was divided among Germany, Italy, and Hungary. For the duration of the war many Slovenes fought a guerrilla war against the Nazis under the leadership of the Croatian-born Communist resistance leader, Marshal Tito. After the final defeat of the Axis powers in 1945, Slovenia was again made into a republic of the newly established Communist nation of Yugoslavia.

In the 1980s, Slovenia agitated for greater autonomy and occasionally threatened to secede. It introduced a multiparty system and in 1990 elected a non-Communist government. Slovenia declared its independence from Yugoslavia on June 25, 1991. The Serbian-dominated Yugoslavian army tried to keep Slovenia in line and some brief fighting took place, but the army then withdrew its forces. Unlike Croatia and Bosnia, Slovenia was able to sever itself from Yugoslavia with relatively little violence. With recognition of its independence granted by the European Community in 1992, the country began realigning its economy and society toward western Europe. Slovenia joined the EU and NATO in 2004.

Islamic History and Muslims

The Muslims in Slovenia are ethnically Bosnians and Albanians. The Muslims constitute 2.4% of Slovenian population. The Islamic Centre of Ljubljana is headed by Nevzet Porić, general secretary of the Muslim community of Slovenia. Porić said 90 percent of the Muslim in Slovenia are Bosnjak (Bosnian), 8 percent Albanian and 2 percent come from other ethnic branches of the large Slav family of the Balkans.

Demographics of Muslims In Slovenia by ethnicity in 2002

Ethnicity

Muslims

Percentage

Bosniaks

19,923

41.95%

Muslims by nationality

9,328

19.64%

Bosnians (Declared as)

5,724

12.05%

Albanians

5,237

11.03%

Slovenes

1,506

3.17%

Roma

868

1.83%

Montenegrins

634

1.33%

Macedonians

507

1.07%

Yugoslavs (Declared as)

55

0.12%

Serbs

53

0.11%

Croats

30

0.06%

Hungarians

8

0.02%

Did not want to reply

817

1.72%

Ethnically undeclared

721

1.52%

Others

445

0.94%

Unknown

308

0.65%

Regionally declared

15

0.03%

Total

47,488

100%

  Islamic Centers and Organizations

Islamic Community Jesenice, Jesenice, Slovenia
URL: www.islamslo.net  

Islamska skupnost CELJE, Republika Slovenija

ISLAMSKA SKUPNOST KOCEVJE, Kocevje
Phone: +386 1 895 45 87
Medžlis islamske skupnosti Velenje, Velenje, Slovenija

Islamska skupnost Postojna, Rakitnik, Slovenia
Phone: 00386-31-381-854

Islamska Skupnost Nova Gorica-Ajdovščina, Aidussina, Slovenia

Muslimanska skupnost Ajdovščina, Ajdovscina, Slovenia
Islamic Center, Ljubljana

Islamic Youth Association of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia
URL: http://www.im-slovenije.org   Phone: +386-51272798

The Muslim Community of Slovenia, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Phone: + 386-1 430 4866

  Islamic Center, Ljubljana
  Islamska skupnost CELJE, Republika Slovenija
  ISLAMSKA SKUPNOST KOCEVJE, Kocevje
  ISLAMSKA SKUPNOST MARIBOR, Maribor
  Islamska Skupnost Nova Gorica-Ajdovščina, Aidussina
  Islamska skupnost Postojna, Rakitnik
  Islamska skupnost Tržič, Cesta na Loko 1, Trzic
  Medžlis islamske skupnosti Velenje, Velenje
  Muslimanska skupnost Ajdovščina, Ajdovscina

  Association BH4 Slovenia, Ljubljana
  Islamic Community Jesenice, Jesenice
  Islamic Youth Association of Slovenia, Ljubljana
  SLOVENSKA MUSLIMANSKA SKUPNOST / The Muslim Community of Slovenia, Ljubljana
  The Muslim Community of Slovenia, Ljubljana

   Muslim Owned Business

References
Islam in Slovenia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam_in_Slovenia   , June, 2008).
Info please ( http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0107971.html ,  June, 2008).
Islam Finder ( http://www.islamicfinder.org/cityPrayerNew.php?country=xx  , June, 2008).
World Religions Statistics ( http://www.adherents.com/adhloc/xx , June, 2008).
Anonymous, Documents from Representatives of Islamic Organizations in Slovenia, June 2008.