ISLAM and MUSLIMS IN SWEDEN

      

General Information

Kingdom of Sweden

National name: Konungariket Sverige

Land area: 158,927 sq mi (411,621 sq km); total area: 173,731 sq mi (449,964 sq km)

Population (2007 est.): 9,031,088

Capital and largest city (2003 est.): Stockholm, 1,622,300 (metro. area), 1,251,900 (city proper)

Other large cities: Göteborg, 506,600; Malmö, 245,300; Uppsala, 127,300

Monetary unit: Krona

Language: Swedish, small Sami- and Finnish-speaking minorities

Ethnicity/race: indigenous population: Swedes with Finnish and Sami minorities; foreign-born or first-generation immigrants: Finns, Yugoslavs, Danes, Norwegians, Greeks, Turks

Religions: Lutheran 87%, Roman Catholic, Orthodox, Baptist, Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist

Literacy rate: 99% (2003 est.)

Economic summary: GDP/PPP (2007 est.): $300.2 billion; per capita $41,100. Real growth rate: 3.1%. Inflation: 0.9%.

Sweden, which occupies the eastern part of the Scandinavian Peninsula, is the fourth-largest country in Europe and is one-tenth larger than California. The country slopes eastward and southward from the Kjólen Mountains along the Norwegian border, where the peak elevation is Kebnekaise at 6,965 ft (2,123 m) in Lapland. In the north are mountains and many lakes. To the south and east are central lowlands and south of them are fertile areas of forest, valley, and plain. Along Sweden's rocky coast, chopped up by bays and inlets, are many islands, the largest of which are Gotland and Öland.

The earliest historical mention of Sweden is found in Tacitus's Germania, where reference is made to the powerful king and strong fleet of the Sviones. In the 11th century, Olaf Sköttkonung became the first Swedish king to be baptized as a Christian. Around 1400, an attempt was made to unite Sweden, Norway, and Denmark into one kingdom, but this led to bitter strife between the Danes and the Swedes. In 1520, the Danish king Christian II conquered Sweden and in the “Stockholm Bloodbath” put leading Swedish personages to death. Gustavus Vasa (1523–1560) broke away from Denmark and fashioned the modern Swedish state. He also confiscated property from the Roman Catholic Church in Sweden to pay Sweden's war debts. The king justified his actions on the basis of Martin Luther's doctrines, which were being accepted nationwide with royal encouragement. The Lutheran Swedish church was eventually adopted as the state church.

Sweden played a leading role in the second phase (1630–1635) of the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648). By the Treaty of Westphalia (1648), Sweden obtained western Pomerania and some neighboring territory on the Baltic. In 1700, a coalition of Russia, Poland, and Denmark united against Sweden and by the Peace of Nystad (1721) forced it to relinquish Livonia, Ingria, Estonia, and parts of Finland. Sweden emerged from the Napoleonic Wars with the acquisition of Norway from Denmark and with a new royal dynasty stemming from Marshal Jean Bernadotte of France, who became King Charles XIV (1818–1844). The artificial union between Sweden and Norway led to an uneasy relationship, and the union was finally dissolved in 1905. Sweden maintained a position of neutrality in both world wars.

Islamic History and Muslims

Sweden has today, almost exclusively due to immigration, a significant Muslim population. During the eighteenth century, Sweden formed an alliance with the Ottoman Empire. This, coupled with the fact that the Swedish king Carl XII lived under Ottoman protection from 1709 to 1714, made the Swedes interested in Islam. Soon, Sweden granted freedom of worship to Muslims. During the eighteenth century, many dissertations about Islam were written at Swedish universities.
The Baltic Tatars were the first Muslim group in modern Sweden. The faith arrived in the country primarily through immigration from countries with large Muslim populations (such as Bosnia and Herzegovina, Turkey, Morocco, Iraq, Iran and Somalia) in the late 20th century. Most Muslims in Sweden are either immigrants or descendants of those immigrants. The majority of them are from the Middle East, especially Iraq and Iran. The second largest Muslim group consists of immigrants or refugees from former Yugoslavia, most of them Bosniaks and Kosovo Albanians. There is also a sizeable community of Somalis. The second largest Arab group are Moroccans, but not all Muslims from Iraq or Morocco are Arabs; among them are Kurds and Berbers, too. There are several mosques in Sweden with notable ones in Malmö and Stockholm.

Until the late1980 s Sweden had the most liberal refugee policy in Europe, which is the reason why the Muslim migrant population includes more refugees from countries such as Turkey, Palestine, Lebanon, Syria and Iran. The immigration and naturalization laws allow application for citizenship after five years of residency and the asylum process is considered fast and less bureaucratic than in other European countries. Almost50 % of the Muslims in Sweden live in and around Stockholm with other centers in Malmoe, Gotteburg and other big cities.

The highest estimates for the late1990's are at 300,000, which would make up for 3 .6% of the Swedish population. Many migrants are employed in industry and the service sector with a high percentage of semi-skilled and unskilled laborers. After 1975 Sweden adopted a multicultural policy affecting education, media and elections. Foreigners are allowed to vote and stand for office in local elections, teaching Swedish to immigrants and their children is an educational priority and government funds are available for immigrant associations, press and broadcasting in minority languages.

Though the Lutheran Church of Sweden is the state church, since 1951 the freedom of religion is part of the Swedish laws and the state can support different religious congregations. The only precondition to be entitled to that support is the foundation of a religious federation, with an established structure and membership lists. As a result the Muslim community enjoys such support, and over the years several Muslim federations have been established. The Swedish school system is an example for the integration of foreign children into the state schools, with gradual increase of teaching in Swedish and the incorporation of ethnic minority teachers to meet the needs of foreign children.

In recent years Sufism, the mystical dimension of Islam, has come to play an important role among Swedish Muslims, especially among the younger generation. The major Sufi orders exist in Sweden, such as the Shadhiliyya, the Naqshbandiyya and the Nimatullahi.

Demography
Although there are no official statistics of Muslims in Sweden, estimates counts 300 000 – 350 000 ethnic Muslims in the year 2000 (i.e. anyone who fits the broad definition of someone who «belongs to a Muslim people by birth, has Muslim origin, has a name that belongs in the Muslim tradition, etc. »), roughly estimated close to 100 000 of which are of second-generation. Of the first-generation Muslims, 255 000 are supposed to be Sunni, 5 000 Shi’ites, no more than 1 000 Ahmadiya, Alevi and other groups, and probably no more than 5 000 converts, mainly women married to Muslim men.
Such numbers does not imply religious beliefs or participation; Åke Sander claimed in 1992 that «40-50% of the ethnic Muslims in Sweden could reasonably be considered to be religious», and in 2004, based on discussions and interviews with Muslim leaders, concerning second-generation Muslims born and raised in Sweden that «it does not seem that the percentage they consider to be religious Muslims in a more qualified sense exceeds fifteen percent, or perhaps even less». Sander re-stated in 2004 that «we do not think it unreasonable to put the figure of religious Muslims in Sweden at the time of writing at close to 150 000».


Conversion
There are no official statistics on the exact number of Swedish converts to Islam, but Dr. Anne Sofie Roald, a historian of religions at Malmö University, estimates the number of converts from the Church of Sweden to Islam to be 3,500 people since the 1960s, with an increase in recent years due to increased Muslim immigration. Dr. Roald further states that conversions are also occurring from Islam to the Church of Sweden, most noticeably by Iranians, but also by Arabs and Pakistanis, who have fled totalitarian regimes with strong religious oppression.

The first known convert to Islam was the famous painter Ivan Aguéli who was initiated into the Shadhiliyya order in Egypt in 1909. It was Aguéli who introduced the French metaphysician René Guénon to Sufism. Aguéli is more known among Sufis by his Muslim name Abdul-Hadi al-Maghribi. Other well-known Swedish converts to Islam are Tage Lindbom, Kurt Almqvist, Mohammed Knut Bernström and Tord Olsson. Lindbom, Almqvist and Olsson are also initiates into various Sufi orders. Bernström translated the Quran into Swedish in 1998.

 Places of worship

The following are some of the places of Islamic worship that can be found today in Sweden:

 

Bellevue Mosque, Gothenburg
 
The Islamic Sunni Centre (Swedish: Islamiska sunnicentret), commonly known as the Bellevue Mosque (Swedish: Bellevuemoskén), is a mosque located at Generalsgatan 2A in the Bellevue-district of Gothenburg, Sweden. It is the city's largest Islamic place of worship and advocates the Salafi movement of Islam. The mosque receives about 25,000 SEK in government subsidies each year from Gothenburg Municipality.

The Bellevue Mosque has been in the focus of media for its alleged ties to radical Islamist groups.[2] The Bellevue Mosque has been accused of having financial ties to the al-Haramain Foundation[3], a Saudi-based charity group which has been listed on the United Nations list of "entities belonging to or associated with al-Qaeda". Representatives from the foundation are also said to have visited the mosque at several occasions.
According to newspaper reports, Mirsad Bektašević, the Swedish citizen of Bosniak descent who was convicted in Sarajevo in 2006 and sentenced to 15 years of imprisonment on charges to commit terrorism, was a frequent attendee of the Bellevue Mosque.
Recently it has also been reported that the mosque has been used to collect money for the Islamic Courts Union (ICU), the Islamist militia in Somalia.
 

Nasir Mosque, Gothenburg, 1963

      

Nasir mosque is a mosque in Gothenburg suburb Högsbohöjd associated ahmadiya Assembly Ahmadiyya Muslim community. Nasir mosque is Sweden's first separate mosque building, and was completed in 1976. . It was designed by white architects. Ahmadiyya Muslim Association i London . In time, the mosque became too crowded, and a new and larger building was inaugurated in 2001, designed by Abdul Raschid from the Ahmadiyya Muslim Association in London. Mosque contains two bönehallar, assembly rooms and imam who dwelling.  Ahmadiyya teachings are not accepted by Islam by most Muslims, and some of them are not denoting Nasir mosque as a mosque.

Malmö Mosque, Malmö, 1984

 The Malmö Mosque is one of Sweden's main mosques located on the outskirts of Malmö in southern Sweden. It was inaugurated in 1984 as the first mosque in Scandinavia. Adjacent to the mosque is the Islamic center which contains an Islamic school and library. It serves as a place of worship for some 55,000 Muslims living in the area.

There have been three arson attacks on the mosque. On September 18, 2005 and on October 21, 2005 the fires were put out quickly and only minor damage was done, but on April 28, 2003 attack the mosque was more severely damaged and other buildings at the Islamic center were totally destroyed. Malmö is one of the main centers for Swedish Muslims.

Fittja Mosque, Stockholm

The Fittja Mosque is a mosque in Turkish style architecture built in the Stockholm suburb of Fittja in Sweden. It is run and was constructed by the local Turkish Islamic Association, and the area has a high concentration of Muslims.

Stockholm Mosque, „Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan's Mosque“ 2000

Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan's Mosque (Swedish: Zaid Ben Sultan Al Nahayans moské, Arabic: جامع زايد بن سلطان آل نهيان‎), commonly known as the Stockholm Mosque (Stockholms moské) or the Stockholm Grand Mosque (Stockholms stora moské), is the largest mosque in Stockholm, Sweden. It is located at Kapellgränd 10, adjacent to the small park Björns trädgård, in the Södermalm district of Stockholm. Inaugurated in 2000, the mosque is administered by the Islamic Association in Stockholm organization.
Originally built as an electric power station known as Katarinastationen ("the Katarina Station"), the building was designed by the Art Nouveau architect Ferdinand Boberg and completed in 1903. Already influenced by "Moorish" Islamic architecture in its original version, the listed building was converted to a mosque during the 1990s. After first consulting Muslim leaders, the Stockholm City Council decided in March 1995 to convert the old power station into a mosque. The ownership of the building was subsequently bought by the Islamic Association in Sweden. The project was delayed because of protests and appeals, and construction began first in 1999. It was inaugurated on 7 June 2000. The mosque was built with financial support from the government of the United Arab Emirates and is named after its principal founder and then head of state, Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan. According to an article in Svenska Dagbladet, the mosque's leadership also has ties to the Sunni pan-Islamist movement Muslim Brotherhood.
The mosque can accommodate 2,000 people and the building includes a library, bookshop, gym, offices, lecture halls and a large kitchen. The building also has a restaurant

 

    Uppsala Mosque

The Uppsala Mosque (Swedish: Uppsala Moské) is a small but very frequented mosque located in the Kvarngärdet neighbourhood of Uppsala in Sweden. At the time of construction, it was erroneously claimed to be the northernmost mosque in the world (Saint Petersburg was). It is still the northernmost mosque in Sweden, a title soon to be taken over by the Umeå mosque.

List of Mosques in Stockholm
 

namn

område

gata/tel.

khutbah på arabiska

khutbah på svenska

khutbah på annan språk

från kl.

Islamiska Centerunionen i Sverige

stan

Sveav. 94

(1)

1

turkiska

1200

Islamiska Förbundet i Stockholm

stan

Björns Trädgård
643 63 60

1

1

-

1200

Swedish Mekteb /
Islamiska Förbundet i Botkyrka

Alby

--

1

-

-

-

Islamiska  Föreningen

Haninge

Jungfrunsg. 410
777 58 81

-

-

-

-

Islamiska Föreningen i Stockholm

stan

Apelbergsg. 34
21 20 99

1

-

engelska

1200

Islamiska  Församlingen

Bredäng

Bredängstorget 30
464 76 06

-

-

-

-

Islamiska Kulturföreningen

Haninge
Jordbro

Blockstensv. 100
500 223 90

-

-

-

-

Islamiska Kulturföreningen

Solna

Kyrkbacken 14
83 41 98

-

-

-

-

Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Botkyrka

Fittja

Krögarv. 4
531 773 94

(1)

-

turkiska

ca. 1140

Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Handen (?)

Handen

Sleipnerv.
-

(1)

-

turkiska

1150

Islamiska  Kulturföreningen i Huddinge

Huddinge

Diagnosv. gårdshus 6
779 35 40

-

-

-

-

Islamiska  Kulturföreningen i Skärholmen

Skärh.

Storholmsg. 27
710 57 47
0707-97 02 32

(1)

-

turkiska

--

Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Spånga

Tensta

Tenstagången 14
795 75 15

(1)

-

turkiska

-

Islamiska  Kurdiskt Kulturcentrum

stan

Bergsundsstrand 42

1

1

-

1155

--

stan

Torsg.

(1)

-

urdu

-

--

Söder

Tjärhovsg.

(1)

-

bangladeshi

-

(Islamiska Shi' a Samfunden i Sverige)

Söder

Malmgårdsv. 32
641 20 45

-

-

-

-

Islamiska Somaliska Kulturcenter

Rinkeby

Fornbyv. 35

-

-

-

-

Islamiska Kulturcentrum

Sollent.

Malmv. 10A
96 47 97

(1)

-

turkiska

-

Islamic associations in Sweden
The beginning of national Islamic (Sunni) institutions in Sweden dates back to the creation of FIFS (Förenade Islamiska Församlingar i Sverige) in 1973-1974. In 1982 and 1984 two splits, due to internal rivalries, cultural differences, personal conflicts and funding, brought to the creation of SMF (Svenska Muslimska Förbundet) and ICUS, today IKUS (Islamska Kulturcenterunionen i Sverige). Others national institutions are BHIRF (Bosnien-Hercegovinas Islamiska riksförbund), founded in 1995 by Bosnian refugees, IRFS (Islamiska Riksförbundet), also since 1995, and SIA (Svenska Islamiska Akademin), founded in the year 2000 by the former ambassador Mohammed Knut Bernström, with the task of establishing in the future an Islamic university in Sweden, charged with imam education. SIA also publishes since February 2001 the periodical Minaret in Swedish. The present editor-in-chief of Minaret is Mohamed Omar.

On a lower level, specific Islamic organizations targeting specific groups have been created as well. SMUF, today SUM (Sveriges Unga Muslimer), is the greatest youth Muslim organization since 1986, but there exist also the women association IKF (Islamiska Kvinnoförbund i Sverige), the youth association IUF (Islamiska Ungdomförbundet i Sverige) and the imam association SIR (Sveriges Imamråd). IIF (Islamiska Informationföreningen) is a member association of FIFS aiming at providing information about Islam in Sweden; 1986-2000 it published Salaam, whose editorial board has always been dominated by women, mainly Swedish converts.

National and target organization have also created umbrella organizations in order to simplify their relationships to the state. FIFS and SMF have created in 1990 SMR (Sveriges Muslimska Råd), of which SUM is also member. The IKUS umbrella organization is named IRIS (Islamiska Rådet i Sverige) and includes also IKF, IUF and SIR. Above all, IS (Islamiska samarbetsrådet) deals with financial issues with the Commission for state grants to religious communities (SST); it includes FIFS, SMF, IKUS, ISS and SIF.

The following are some of the Islamic associations in Sweden:


Islamic Association in Stockholm
Muslim Association of Sweden (SMF)
Muslim Council of Sweden (SMR)

Political controversies
The Muslim Council of Sweden (SMR), an umbrella organization for Swedish Muslim organizations, has been involved in several controversies. In 2006 Mahmoud Aldebe, one of the Board members of SMR, sent letters to each of the major political parties in Sweden demanding special legislation for Muslims in Sweden, including the right to specific Islamic holidays, special public financing for the building of Mosques, that all divorces between Muslim couples be approved by an Imam, and that Imams should be allowed to teach Islam to Muslim children in public schools. The request was condemned by all political parties and the government and the Swedish Liberal Party requested that an investigation be started by the Office of the Exchequer into the use of public funding of SMR. The Chairman of the Board of SMR subsequently stated that it supported the demands made by Aldebe but that it did not think that the letter had been a good idea to communicate them in a list of demands.

Although the Board of SMR did not condemn Aldebe the letter has caused conflict within the organization.

SMR has also been accused of being closely allied to the Swedish Social Democrat Party, which has been criticised both inside and outside the party.

Swedish social anthropologist Aje Carlbom and parliamentarian Abderisak Aden, who has founded the Islamic Democratic Institute (Islamiska demokratiska institutet), have both stated that they believe that at least part of the leading members of SMR support Islamist ideologies and are influenced by the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood.

The Brandbergen Mosque has been described by the FBI terrorism consultant Evan Kohlmann as a propaganda central for the Armed Islamic Group (GIA). According to Kohlmann, people connected to the mosque also participated in the financing of GIA:s bombing campaign in France in 1995.

In 2004 an Arabic-language manual, which carried the logo and address of the Brandbergen Mosque, was spread on the internet. The manual described the construction of simple chemical weapons, including how to build a chemical munition from an ordinary artillery round.

On December 7, 2006, the Swedish citizen Mohamed Moumou, who is described by the United States Department of the Treasury as an "uncontested leader of an extremist group centered around the Brandbergen Mosque in Stockholm", was put on the United Nations Security Council Committee 1267 list of foreign terrorists.

Popular perceptions on Islamic fundamentalism
In a survey conducted by Taylor Nelson Sofres on behalf of the UK-based think tank Open Europe in March 2007, 56% of the Swedish respondents agreed with the statement that "Islamic fundamentalism is a serious threat for our country".
 

Al-Ghazali Institute in Stockholm

  Islamic Centers and Organizations

ISLAMISKA SUNNI CENTRET - GOTEORG, Goteborg, Göteborg
Phone: 0046-31-846304
Mosque of Stockholm, Stockholm, handen
Phone: 08-509 109 00

Ahl Essonah Islamiska Föreningen, Helsingborg, Skåne
Phone: 004642134496

Bellvue Mosque, Gothenburg, 46
Phone: 0046737342993

Hotorget Mosque, Stockholm
Phone: 08-21 20 99

Islamiska skola, Stockholm, kista
URL: www.islamiskaskolan.com   Phone: +46 8-7516804

ISLAMISKA FÖRBUNDET I SVERIGE, Stockholm
URL: www.islamiskaforbundet.se   Phone: +46850910900

Arabiska kulturförening i Malmö, Malmo
Phone: 004640221656

Islamic Center I Malmö, Malmo, malmö
URL: http://www.mosken.se   Phone: 040-228 320

Jarfalla Islamic Center, Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: 08-580 107 65

Afghanska Kultur Föreningen i Sverige, Stockholm
  Ahl Essonah Islamiska Föreningen, Helsingborg
  Akalla Islamic Center, Kista
  AL-MUSTAFA FÖRENING, Karlshamn
  Albayan kultur förening, Helsingborgs Kommun
  ALHOUDA ISLAMISKA & KULTUR FÖRENING, FALKÖPING
  Alhuda Mosque, Marsta
  All brothers and sisters in islam..here in Umeå, Ume
  Alnoor Masjed, Lidkoping
  Alnor kulturförening, Surahammar
  Arab Information and Cultural Center, Stockholm
  Bellvue Mosque, Gothenburg
  Blekinge Institute of Technology, Ronneby, Ronneby
  Borlänge Islamic Centre, Borlange
  Bosnia Mosque, Varnamo
  Bosnian Islamic Center, Boras
  Bosnian Masjed, Landskrona
  Bosniska Islamic Center, Goteborg
  Bosnjacka Islamska Zajednica, Gothenburg
  Bosnjakiska Islamic Center, Malmo
  Bosnjakiska islamiska församlingen, Jonkoping
  Botkyrka Islamic Center, Norsborg
  Dawaa Islamiska Skola Föreningen, Goteborgs Kommun
  Dawah Assosiation, Goteborgs Hamn
  Eslövs Islamiska Kulturförening, Eslöv
  Falkenberg Islamiska Kul. Föreningen, Falkenberg
  Foundation Skovde Mosque, Skovde
  Gambianska Islamic Center, Goteborg
  gävle islamic centar, Gavle Outer Road
  Gävle Islamiska Center, Gafle
  Gävle Islamiska Center, Gefle
  Goteborg Islamic Cultural Center, Goteborg
  Halmstad Islamiska Barn & kultor Förening, Halmstads Kommun
  Hällefors Islamiska Förening, Hallefors Kommun
  Hemgatan Mosque, Linkoping/Malmen
  Hotorget Mosque, Stockholm
  Husby Islamic Cultural Center, Stockholm
  Husby Islamic Cultural Center, Kista
  Islamic Association in Uppsala, Uppsala
  Islamic Association in Uppsala / Islamiska Föreningen i Uppsala, Uppsala Kommun
  ISLAMIC CENTER, Vaxjo Kommun
  Islamic Center, Stockholm
  ISLAMIC CENTER, Malmo
  Islamic Center i Flen, Flen
  Islamic Center I Malmö, Malmo
  Islamic Center of Malmo, Stockholm
  Islamic center of Sweden, Spanga
  Islamic Center Uddevalla, Uddevalla
  ISLAMIC CENTRE & MUSLIM STUDENTS LUND, Lund
 
islamic clutcher förning, Nacka

Islamic cultur center, Norrkoping
  Islamic Cultural Center, Stockholm
  Islamic Cultural Center, Eskilstuna
  Islamic Cultural Center, Norsborg
  Islamic Cultural Center, Arebro
  Islamic Cultural Center, Vastervik
  Islamic Cultural Center, Sundsvall, Sundsvall
  Islamic Cultural centre, Husby, Husby
  Islamic Foundation, Stockholm
  Islamic Information Center, Goteborg
  Islamic Information Center, Stockholm
  Islamic kultur center, Skelleftea
  Islamic kultur förening salam i Kalmar, Kalmar
  ISLAMISK KULTUR CENTER I NORRKÖPING, Norrkopings Kommun
  Islamisk kultur förening salam i kalmar, Kalmar Slott
  Islamiska Föreringen i västerbotten, Ume River
  Islamiska Centerunionen, Stockholm
  Islamiska centret- Föreningen Pegasus, Hultsfreds Kommun
  Islamiska Cultur centret, Orebro
  ISLAMISKA FÖRBUNDET I SVERIGE, Stockholm
  Islamiska Förbundet i Linköping, Linkopings Kommun
  Islamiska Förbundet i Linköping, Linkoping
  Islamiska Förbundet i Stockholm, Stockholm
  Islamiska Förbundet i Växjö, Vaxjo/Kronoberg
  Islamiska Föreningen i Luleå, Lulea
  Islamiska Föreningen i Luleå, Lulea Kommun
  Islamiska Föreningen i Södermanland, Eskilstuna
  islamiska föreningen i umeå, Umea
  Islamiska föreningen i Uppsala, Upsala
  Islamiska föreningen, Abo Bakr alsiddiq mosken, Halmstad
  Islamiska församling I landskrona, Landskrona Kommun
  Islamiska Församlingen i Kristianstad, Kristianstad
  Islamiska Församlingen i Umeå, Umea
  Islamiska forening i Halmstad, Halmstad
  Islamiska Foreningen I Vasterbotten, Umea
  Islamiska Forskning Centre, Haninge
  Islamiska forskningscentret, Goteborg
  Islamiska Informations Föreningen, Lindesbergs Kommun
  Islamiska Kultur Center i Norrköping, Norrköping
  Islamiska Kultur Centret, Orebro Lan
  Islamiska kultur centret, Orebro Kommun
  Islamiska kultur centret, Sundsvalls Kommun
  Islamiska Kultur Centret, Sundsvall
  Islamiska Kultur centret i Nyköping, Nykopingsan
  Islamiska Kultur Centret i Nyköping, Nykopings Kommun
  Islamiska Kultur Föreningen, Trollhattans Kommun
  Islamiska Kultur Huset, Malmo
  Islamiska Kulturföreningen, Stockholm
  Islamiska Kulturföreningen, Karlskrona
 
Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Botkyrka, Stockholm

Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Huddinge, Stockholm
  Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Skärholmen, Stockholm
  Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Spånga, Stockholm
  Islamiska Samfundet I Skandinavien, Stockholm
  Islamiska Somaliska Kulturcenter, Stockholm
  Islamiska Sunni Center i Göteborg, Gothenburg
  ISLAMISKA SUNNI CENTRET - GOTEORG, Goteborg
  Islamiskt Center, Uppsala
  Islamiskt Kulturcentrum, Stockholm
  Jarfalla Islamic Center, Stockholm
  Jönköpings Islamiska församling, Råslätt, Jonkoping
  köpings sunnah islamiska förening, Koping
  Malmoe Islamic Center, Malmo Central
  Masdjid Ennoor, Muslimska Föreningen Kulturella Sunna i Norrbotten, Bodens Kommun
  Masjed, Gavle
  Masjed ABO BAKR Al-SIDDIQ, Halmstads Kommun
  Masjid, Avesta
  Masjid Ljungdala, Hassleholm
  Masjid.Falköping Islamiska Förening, Falkoping
  Mölndals Moske, Molndal
  Mosque, Lindesberg
  mosque , Flemingsberg
  Mosque of Stockholm, Stockholm
  Multiethnic mosque, Saffle
  Muslim services foundation, Stockholm
  Rinkeby Islamiska Kulturfِrening, Stockholm
  Sabirin Mosque, Eskilstuna
  Sabirinmoskén, Eskilstuna Kommun
  Salahuddin Mosque, Stockholm
  Södra Dalarna Islamiska Kultur Center, Avesta Kommun
  skarholmen islamiska kultur forining, Stockholm North
  Skellefteå islamiska kulturcenter, Skelleftea Kommun
  somaliekulturförening, Kumla
  Stiftelsen Växjö Muslimer, Vaxjo Kommun
  Stockholms Moske, Stockholm
  Stora moskén, Stockholm
  Strängnäs Muslimska Föreningen, Strangnas Kommun
  Sveriges Islamiska Skolor (SIS), Stockholm
  Sveriges Muslimska Förbund (SMF), Stockholm
  Swedish Mekteb, Stockholm
  Tensta Islamiska Kulturfِrening, Stockholm
  Turkish Mosque, Haninge Kommun
  Turkisk-Svensk Muslim Kulturfrening, Stockholm
  Turkiska Islamiska Kulturfreningen, Stockholm
  Turkiska o. Islamska Fِreningen, Stockholm
  Turkmeniska Kulturfreningen, Vasteras
  Tyresِ Islamiska Kulturfِrening, Stockholm
  مركز النور الاسلامي الثقافي, Surahammars Kommun
  مركز الهدى الثقافي, Vasteras
  مسجد التوحيد , Gusum
Vasteras islamiska center, Vasteras
  västerås islamiska center, Vasteras Kommun
  Växjö Islamiska Center, Vaxjo
 
جامع الشيخ زايد, Stockholm

Ahel Al Sunnah Föreningen i Hbg, Helsingborgs Kommun
  ALRISALAH SKANDINAVISKA STIFTELSE, Orebro Lan
  ALRISALAH SKANDINAVISKA STIFTELSE, Orebro
  Alusra stiftelse för islamiska rådgivning och upprättelse, Orebro
  Arabiska Freningen, Gavle
  Arabiska kulturförening i Malmö, Malmo
  Association of the Islamic Unity in Sweden, Stockholm
  Blixten scout Kår, Kristianstad
  Borlänges Unga muslimer, Borlange
  Bosniakiska kultur-islamiska församlingen, Trollhattans Kommun
  Bosnien & Hercegovina Fِrsamling, Stockholm
  Bosnien Herzegovina Fِrsamling, Osthammar
  Bosnien-Hercegovina Muslimska Ungdomsfِrbund, Sundbyberg
  Bosnien-Hercegovina Muslimska Ungdomsfِrbund, Stockholm
  Bosnisk Islamic Organization, Gislaved
  Bosnisk Islamisk Fِrsamling, Orebro
  Bosniska - Islamic Center, Stockholm
  Bosniska Islamiska Föreningen, Jonkopings Lan
  Bosniska Islamska Fِrsamlingen, Norrkoping
  Bosnjakiska Islamiska Fِrsamlingen, Linkoping
  Chalmers Islamiska Förening, Goteborg
  Chalmers Islamiska Förening, Goeteborg
  Chalmers Islamiska Foreningen, Gothenburg
  Dalarna Muslim Students, Borlange
  Dawah Tabligh Frening, Norsborg
  Dawat tabligh Center, Stockholm
  Ethiopian Muslims Assosation, Stockholm
  Förenade Islamiska Församlingar i Sverige (FIFS), Stockholm
  FEDERATION OF ISLAMIC STUDENTS ASSO., Malmo
  FITTJA PAKISTANI ISLAMIC CENTRE, Norsborg
  Ibn Rushd Studieförbund, Stockholm
  IQRA FÖRENING I UPPSALA, Uppsala
  Islamic Association, Norrland
  Islamic Association and Cultural center, Vasteras
  Islamic Association of Sponga, Stockholm
  Islamic Brotherhood, Stockholm
  Islamic Center, Gatebo
  Islamic Cultural Association, Malma
  Islamic Cultural Association, Stockholm
  Islamic Cultural Association, Gatebo
  Islamic Cultural Association, Skaboholmen
  Islamic Cultural Association, Tumba
  Islamic Cultural Association, Uddevalla
  Islamic Cultural Association, Spanga
  Islamic Cultural Association, Huddinge
  Islamic Cultural Association, Morsta
  Islamic Cultural Association, Spanga
  Islamic Cultural Association, Kista
  Islamic Cultural Association, Arebo
 
Islamic Cultural Association, Jarva

Islamic Cultural Association, Blekinge
  Islamic Cultural Association, Boras
  Islamic Cultural Association, Goteborg
  Islamic Federation of Goteborg, Goteborg
  Islamic Federation of Stockholm, Stockholm
  Islamic Foundation, Halmstad
  Islamic Radio service, Stockholm
  Islamic Relief, Stockholm
  ISLAMIC RELIEF SWEDEN, Solna
  Islamic Scandinavia Care Organisation, Goteborg
  Islamic Union, Goteborg
  Islamic Welfare, Arebro
  Islamika Kulturforeningen, Malmo Central
  Islamiska Föreningen, Stockholm
  Islamiska föreningen i Fagersta, Fagersta
  Islamiska Föreningen i Stockholm, Stockholm
  Islamiska FörsamlingenFöreningen i Stockholm, Stockholm
  Islamiska Forbundet Botkyrka, Stockholm
  Islamiska forskningscentret, Gothenburg
  Islamiska Fِörsamlingen i Lanskrona, Landskrona
  Islamiska Fِrebund, Malmo
  Islamiska kultur center, Norrkoping
  Islamiska kultur förening Järva, Stockholm
  Islamiska Kultur Föreningen i Karlskrona, Karlskrona Kommun
  Islamiska Kultur Föreningen i Malmö, Malmo
  Islamiska Kulturcentret Khulafa al Rashidin, Linkoping
  Islamiska Kulturföreningen i Märsta, Stockholm
  Islamiska Studieförbundet, Alvsjo
  Islamiskt kurdiskt kultur centrum, Stockholm
  Komiteen Muslimsk Information, Hundeskar
  Koranläsare Förbund i Scandinavian, Gothenburg
  Lulea Muslim Solidarity Group, Lulea
  Mariestad Muslims Assocition, Mariestad
  Merhamet Svensk-Bosnisk Humaniter Fِrening, Enkoping
  Muslim cultural center, Skaddaive
  MUSLIM FEDERATION SVERIGES MUSLIMSKA, Stockholm
  Muslim foundation, Banghagen
  Muslim Funeral Service, Fredriksberg
  Muslim Kommun, Lulea Kommun
  Muslim Kِtt AB, Goteborg
  Muslim World League, Fredriksberg
  Muslim Youth League, Valby
  Muslims academic council, Malmo
  Muslimska Fِreldrars Ekonomiska Fِrening, Uppsala
  Muslimska Fِreningen Botkyrka, Stockholm
  Muslimska Fِrsamlingen, Malmo
  Muslimska Fِrsamlingen i Mariestad, Skovde
  Muslimska Kvinnofِreningen, Stockholm
  Negashi Islamiska Fِreningen, Stockholm
 
Palastinsk-Svinska -Förinng, Kristianstad

Palestinagrupperna i Sverige, Stockholm
  Scandinavian Islamic Organisation, Stockholm
  Skoِvde Muslimska Kulturfِrening, Skovde
  SMUF - Sveriges Muslimska Ungdoms forbund, Stockholm
  Socialistiska Arab Jamahiriyas Folkkontor, Stockholm
  Strängnäs muslimska föreningen, Stockholm
  Svensk-Arabisk Venskaps frening, Helsingborg
  SVERIGES MUSLIMSKA RAD, Stockholm
  Sveriges Muslimska Rad, Stockholm
  Sveriges Muslimska Stiftelse, Goteborg
  Sveriges Muslimska Ungdomsfِrbund, Stockholm
  Sveriges Unga Muslimer, Stockholm
  Sweden Arabic Board, Stockholm
  Swedish Islamic Academy National Organization, Stockholm
  Swedish Young Muslims, Stockholms Kommun
  Turkish Islamic Association, Norsborg
  Växjö Islamiska Skola, Vaxjo/Kronoberg
  الرابطة الإسلامية, Goeteborg
  تجمع الوحدة الاسلامية, Stockholm
 
جمعية الفـــرات الثقافية, Vasteras

Academia Arabesca, Stockholm
  Al-Azhar Skolan, Orebro
  Alsalam skolan مدرسة السلام, Orebro
  An-Noor Al-Islamia Kommun Skolan, Norrkoping
  AN-Noor Skolan, Linkoping
  AN-NOOR Skolan مدرسة النور الاسلامية, Norrkopings Kommun
  Araby Skolan, Vaxjo
  Dar Al Uloum Skolan, Linkoping
  Dar Al-Muna, Stockholm
  Iman Skolan, Uppsala
  Islamic Fund, Stockholm
  Islamic School, Goteborg
  Islamiska skola, Stockholm
  Islamiska Skolan, Kista
  Manar Al Houda skola Kommun, Uppsala
  Römosseskolan ( Islamiska Skolan ), Goteborg
  Svenska Islamiska Akademien, Arsta
 
Ulokalima islamske škole, Vaxjo

   Muslim Owned Business

Aashoor livs, Hassleholm
  Al-iman haj & omrahحملة الايمان للحج والعمرة, Stockholm
  Al-Madinah, Stockholm
  Aladdin Livs, Borlange
  Alansar group for Hajj&Omra, Uppsala Lan
  Alibaba Frisör Salong, Stockholm
  Almimeh Central Service, Boras
  AWW Translations, Solna
  Bergsjöns Halal kött, Goeteborg
  Hijab Now, Stockholm
  Huddinge Tobak & Spel, Stockholms Sodra
  Islamic Cultural Association, Haninge
  Malmö Bildepå AB, Malmo
  Moroccan Restaurant, Stockholm
  Mousa Shop - Halal Food, Gothenburg
  Qibbla Halal Kِtt AB, Stockholm
  SINDEBAD SUPER MARKET, Harnosands Kommun
  Style Council A/B ( Souvenir Shop), Stockholm
 
Work from Home, Borgholm

References
Islam in Sweden ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islam_in_Sweden   , October, 2008).
Info please ( http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0108008.html ,  October, 2008).
Islam Finder ( http://www.islamicfinder.org/cityPrayerNew.php?country=sweden   , October, 2008).
Islam in Sweden  ( http://www.islamawareness.net/Europe/Sweden/sweden.html  , October, 2008).
Anonymous, Documents from Representatives of Islamic Organizations in Sweden, October 2008.